• Photos
  • Past Personnel
  • 2011 News
  • 2010 News
  • 2009 News
  • 2008 News
  • 2007 News

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

The Barlow Endowment for Music Composition was established in September of 1983 under the auspices of Milton A. and Gloria Barlow, who presented a substantial gift to Brigham Young University to engender and support excellence in musical composition. The Board of Directors and Board of Advisors have subsequently been engaged in employing the proceeds of the Endowment to support four programs: The Barlow Prize, General Commissions, LDS Composer Commissions, and Education Grants.

Past Advisors and Judges

2011
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Steven Ricks Laurie Baefsky
David Rakowski Keith Bradshaw
Ethan Wickman April Clayton
Stacy Garrop Adam Marks
Todd Coleman  
2010
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Steven Ricks Paul Frehner
David Rakowski Lois Shapiro
Ethan Wickman Monte Belknap
Stacy Garrop K. Newell Dayley
Todd Coleman  
2009
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Daniel Gawthrop Joseph Alessi
Steven Ricks John Costa
David Rakowski Kory Katseanes
Ethan Wickman Will Kimball
  Neil Thornock
2008
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Lansing McLoskey Julie Bevan
Daniel Gawthrop John Costa
Steven Ricks David Dzubay
David Rakowski Judith Eissenberg
  Blaise Magniere
2007
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Melinda Wagner John Costa
Claude Baker Ray Dillard
Lansing McLoskey Anders Loguin
Daniel Gawthrop Adam Sliwinski
Steven Ricks  
2006
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Murray Boren David Dzubay
Melinda Wagner Michael Hicks
Claude Baker Michael Haithcock
Lansing McLoskey Lt. Col. Michael Colburn
Daniel Gawthrop Jack Delaney
2005
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Murray Boren David Crumb
Melinda Wagner Michael Runyan
Claude Baker Linda Relchert
Lansing McLoskey Kurt Rohde
Daniel Gawthrop David Dzubay
  Xak Bjerken
2004
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Bruce Polay Philip Brunell
Melinda Wagner Michael Emery
Murray Boren Brady Allred
Claude Baker  
Lansing McLoskey  
2003
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Bruce Polay Robert Beaser
Melinda Wagner David Blackinton
Murray Boren Rosalind Hall
Claude Baker Kory Katseanes
Lansing McLoskey Ronald Staheli
  Ardean Watts
2002
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Barlow Bradford Philip Hahn
Bruce Polay Don Cook
Melinda Wagner  
Murray Boren  
Claude Baker  
2001
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Stephen Jones Eric Mills
Claude Baker Jeffry Peterson
Barlow Bradford  
Bruce Polay  
Chen Yi  
2000
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Augusta Read Thomas Donald McCullough
Stephen Jones Michael Emery
Claude Baker Philip Brunelle
Barlow Bradford  
Bruce Polay  
1999
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Chen Yi Bundit Ungrangsee
Stephen Jones Frank Proto
Claude Baker  
Barlow Bradford  
Bruce Polay  
1998
Advisors
:
Michael Runyan  
LaMar Barrus  
Libby Larsen  
Stephen Jones  
Claude Baker  
1997
Advisors

Stephen Jones  
Steven Stucky  
Michael Runyan  
Libby Larsen  
LaMar Barrus  
1996
Advisors
 
Libby Larsen  
Steven Stucky  
Michael Runyan  
David Sargent  
LaMar Barrus  
1995
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Libby Larsen Claude Baker
Steven Stucky  
Michael Runyan  
David Sargent  
LaMar Barrus  
1994
Advisors

Crawford Gates  
Michael Runyan  
Libby Larsen  
David Sargent  
Steven Stucky  
1993
Advisors

Michael Runyan  
Libby Larsen  
Crawford Gates  
David Sargent  
Steven Stucky  
1992
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Joseph Schwantner Steven Stucky
Crawford Gates George Tsontakis
Michael Runyan  
Libby Larsen  
David Sargent  
1991
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Brent Pierce Frances Richard
Crawford Gates Egil Smedwig
Michael Runyan  
Libby Larsen  
1990
Advisors
Guest Judges:
Joseph Schwantner Larry Curtis
Frances Richard Richard Strange
Brent Pierce  
Joseph Downing  
Crawford Gates  

2011 Barlow Winners


Barlow Prize Winner
Clint Needham

The Barlow Endowment for Music Composition at Brigham Young University takes pleasure in announcing commission winners for 2011. After reviewing 170 composer applications from several countries worldwide, the judging panel awarded Clint Needham of Delaware, Ohio, the $12,000 Barlow Prize to compose a major new work for woodwind quintet. The panel also granted Jack Perla of San Francisco the distinction of Honorable Mention in this competition. 

Dr. Needham has two graduate composition degrees from Indiana University where he garnered a four-year Jacobs School of Music doctoral fellowship. His composition teachers there included Claude Baker, David Dzubay and Michael Gandolfi. He also studied with Robert Beaser, Christopher Rouse, and George Tsontakis. His extensive list of awards, residencies, commissions, and fellowships includes (among many others) the Charles Ives Scholarship, Missou/Alarm Will Sound New Music Festival, Jacob Druckman Prize, and multiple citations from BMI and ASCAP. He publishes with Theodore Presser Co. and records with Summit Records. For more information, please visit his website.

General Commission Recipients
Ted Hearne
A Far Cry
Tarik O'Regan
Utah Chamber Artists
Jack Perla
TwoSense
Michael Quell
Strung Out Trio and Ensemble Aventure
Mathew Rosenblum
Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble
Evis Sammoutis
New York Woodwind Quintet
Peter Van Zandt Lane The Quux Collective
LDS Commission Recipients
Christian Asplund
BYU Chamber Orchestra
Douglas Pew
Mark Tollefsen
Benjamin Taylor
Omaha Symphony
Neil Thornock
Will Kimball and the BYU Philharmonic

In considering 106 applications in our General and LDS commissioning programs the Endowment granted $63,000 to eleven composers who will write works for the following ensembles and musicians: Ted Hearne (A Far Cry); Mathew Rosenblum (Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble); Tarik O’Regan (Utah Chamber Artists); Evis Sammoutis (New York Woodwind Quintet); Michael Quell (Strung Out Trio and Ensemble Adventure); Peter Van Zandt Lane (Quux Collective); Jack Perla (Two Sense); Neil Thornock (Will Kimball and Brigham Young University Philharmonic); Benjamin Taylor (Omaha Symphony); Christian Asplund (tenor and BYU Chamber Orchestra); and Douglas Pew (Mark Tollefsen/piano).

The judging panel included the Endowment’s Board of Advisors:  Steven Ricks, David Rakowski, Ethan Wickman, Todd Coleman, and Stacy Garrop. Keith Bradshaw served as a guest judge in the deliberations.  Adam Marks, Laurie Baefsky and April Clayton represented the Fifth House, Imani Winds, and Orpheus Winds woodwind quintets.  These three ensembles comprise the Endowment’s performing consortium that will premiere the new work in 2013.

The Endowment wishes to thank all composers and ensembles who applied for commissions.  Because of limited resources and difficult economic times, the Endowment regrets that many deserving composers and their projects went unfunded this year.  Next year’s Barlow Prize will feature a new work for a capella choir.  You should receive information regarding the details after the first of the year.

2011 News

Saxophonist John Butcher at BYU

John ButcherJohn Butcher, British saxophone luminary, gave a lecture on March 11, 2011 as part of the Barlow Lecture Series. Butcher is a well known soloist and has released seven CD's of solo saxophone music. He has recently began exploring unusual site-specific acoustics, and has toured in Europe, North America, Japan, and Australia.

In addition to a lecture, John Butcher and BYU's Group for Experimental Music performed on March 12, 2011. The Group for Experimental Music, conducted by Christian Asplund, will perform compositions, improvisations, and comprovisations. Butcher will perform improvisations, his own compositions, mutitracked saxophone pieces and explorations with feedback and extreme acoustics.

premieres and performances  

Gregory MertlA new work written by composer Gregory Mertl, entitled Piano Concerto, premiered November 22, 2011. This Barlow commissioned piece for solo piano and symphonic winds was performed in the Ted Mann Concert Hall at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN. The featured piano soloist, Solungga Fang-Tzu Liu, was accompanied by the University of Minnesota Symphonic Wind Ensemble with Craig Kirchoff conducting.

Lansing McLoskeyLansing McLoskey's composition, What We Do Is Secret, premiered October 9, 2011 in the Boston Conservatory Theater in Boston, Massachusetts. The piece was performed by Triton Brass and the Boston Conservatory Wind Ensemble, with Eric Hewitt as conductor.

Eric Hewitt, Chair of Woodwinds at the Boston Conservatory, stated, "[McLoskey] produced what I believe to be the only truly significant and meaningful work for solo Brass Quintet and Wind Ensemble composed to date. ... What We Do Is Secret is sophisticated, gripping, abstract yet engaging, sometimes hauntingly beautiful, and filled with virtuosity. This is American music at its best - imaginative, challenging, powerful, and direct."

Jobey Wilson, tubist with Triton Brass, said the piece was, "...like no wind ensemble piece I've ever heard or played...every wind ensemble conductor in America should hear this amazing addition to the [repetoire]!"

Missy MazzoliA new composition by Missy Mazzoli, entitled Violent, Violent Sea, premiered June 18, 2011. This piece, conducted by Louis Karchin, was performed by the League of Composers Chamber Orchestra at the Miller Theatre in New York City, New York during the League of Composers/ISCM season finale concert.

Joseph SowaJoseph Sowa's Barlow commission, Book of Imaginary Beings (name changed to A Field Guide to Natural History), premiered June 7, 2011. The piece featured bassist Eric Hansen along with pianist Scott Holden, saxophonist Dave Kjar, and percussionist Ron Brough at the 2011 Convention of the International Society of Bassists in Knuth Hall in San Francisco, California.

Jesse JonesJesse Jones' new work, Through the Veil, premiered April 30, 2011 at Bailey Hall in Ithaca, New York. The piece was performed by the Cornell Wind Ensemble with Cynthia Johnston-Turner as conductor.

Pierre JalbertString Quartet No. 5, Pierre Jalbert's Barlow commission, premiered April 28, 2011 Houston, Texas at the Stude Concert Hall on the campus of Rice University. The piece was performed by the Emerson String Quartet for the 50th anniversary season of the Houston Friends of Chamber Music.

Yu-Hui ChangIt Is an Illusion You Were Ever Free, Yu-Hui Chang's Barlow commissioned piece, premiered April 16, 2011. The piece was performed by the Triple Helix Piano Trio and the Wellesley College Chamber Singers, conducted by Lisa Graham, at the Houghton Chapel on the campus of Wellesley College in Wellesley, Massachusetts.

David SanfordDavid Sanford's Barlow commission Long Time Coming premiered April 9, 2011. The piece was performed by pianist Lara Downes and the Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet. The performance was held at the Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts in Davis, California.

Former U.S. Poet Laureate, Rita Dove, whose poem Testimonial was featured in the piece, exclaimed, "What a fantastic piece! The fusion of piano, small jazz combo, and voice is focused, passionate, yet infinitely 'cool.' In short, the piece, and the performance of it, is exquisitely magical."

A live recording of the entire piece can be heard by clicking here. Video clips can be seen by clicking here.

 

Brian CurrentWhirling Dervish, Brian Current's Barlow commissioned work, premiered April 1, 2011. The Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony performed the piece at the Centre In The Square in Kitchener, Ontario Canada.

Larry PolanskiLarry Polansky's newcomposition, Three Pieces for Two Pianos, premiered March 17, 2011. It was performed by Joe Kubera and Marilyn Nonken at the Interpretations Concert Series in the Roulette Concert Hall in New York City, New York.

Augusta Read ThomasA Barlow Commission composed by Augusta Read Thomas, entitled Radiant Circles, premiered March 10 and 11, 2011 in Woolsey Hall in New Haven, Connecticut. The piece was performed by the New Haven Symphony with William Boughton, conducting.

In a review by the New Haven Register, David J. Baker said that the piece, "is abstract music that, true to its title, seems to revolve about the stage, highlighting different instrumental groups. It explores orchestral colors in an apparently spontaneous, random way, without any repeated sequences that might help structure it for the listener."

In addition, he said, "there is a suggested pattern in the growth from smaller to larger fragments, the progress from light to dark, and the rise in intensity — emphasized by the big timpani solos near the end. Music Director William Boughton, in introducing the piece, spoke of hints of sunrise, but the bright, dissonant woodwind chords evoked something more dramatic than rosy-fingered dawn."

To view the full article, click here.

Neil ThornockNeil Thornock's Barlow commissioned piece, Corrugated Refrains, was performed on March 8, 2011 in the Madsen Recital Hall at Brigham Young University. Dr. Kenneth A. Long, Assistant Professor of Clarinet and Woodwind Coordinator for Georgia State University, performed the piece for solo bass clarinet.

http://www.michaelgandolfi.com/Michael Gandolfi's new work, Double Concerto for Clarinet and Bassoon (From Eve's of Reeds), premiered March 5, 2011. This piece was performed by the Melrose Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Yoichi Udagawa, with bassonist Richard Svoboda and clarinetist Erin Svoboda at the Memorial Hall in Melrose, Massachusetts.

Seth StewartThree Muses, a new composition by Seth Stewart premiered February 24, 2011 in Eugene, Oregon in Beall Hall on the campus of the University of Oregon. Seth conducted the piece, which was performed by the Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble (ECCE).

Leilei TianLeilei Tian's Barlow commission, In Our Image, In Our Likeness, premiered February 18, 2011 in Fylkingen New Music and Media Arts Center in Stockholm, Sweden. It was performed by violinist Karin Hellqvist and Anna Petrini on recorder.

Claude BakerA new piece by Claude Baker, entitled From Noon to Starry Night, premiered January 7 - 8, 2011 in the Hilbert Circle Theatre in Indianapolis, Indiana. An additional performance took place on January 9, 2011 at the Indiana University Musical Arts Center, also in Indianapolis. The soloist for these performances was pianist Marc-Andre Hamelin. He was accompanied by the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra with Gilbert Varga conducting.

Peter Jacobi of the Herald Times in Bloomington, Indiana stated that the piece "emerges as music surely interesting enough, music skillfully designed and intriguingly orchestrated with all sorts of striking resonances, music stylistically varied from fully contemporary to effusively Romantic, music stimulating enough to draw and sustain a listener's attention."

In regards to the usage of Whitman's poetry, Jacobi stated, "On listening to Baker's musical responses to Whitman's verbal stimulus, one can latch on to connections. The opening movement offers drumbeats and a metallic, warlike ambiance, a tumult suggestive of "Beat! Beat! Drums!" There is a lovely tilt to the movement about lilacs and resurgent nature. Ecstatic joy may be discerned in the closing movement, stirred by "The Mystic Trumpeter.""

To view the full article, click here.


Back To Top

Reports

Annual Education Reports
Steven RicksSteven Ricks
Associate Professor, Composition and Theory
School of Music, BYU

Students:
A large share of the Education Grant funds always go towards direct student support, by way of scholarships, assistantships, internships, travel awards and fee support for festivals and performances, and support for guest composers and performers that work directly with students.

The BYU composition area admitted five new masters students that started the program in fall 2010, and Barlow funds allowed us to offer each of them half-tuition scholarships as they began their studies.  Barlow funds also supported several assistantships that allowed our students to help teach/administer some of our core theory and composition classes, including Composition 1 (Music 188), Form and Analysis (Music 395), and Orchestration 1 (Music 481).  This sort of teaching experience is helpful to their personal musical development and also provides them with professional experience that will help them when they apply to graduate school or university teaching positions.

August 2010 marked the sixth year BYU student interns have assisted with the annual Barlow summit and Barlow Prize and Commissions judging.   Four of our students—Hayley Weight, Mark Witmer, Curtis Smith, and Zach Van Houten—helped prepare the applicants’ files, coordinating hundreds of scores, recordings, and other materials that would be used in the judging process.  They then attended the summit, which included several days of reviewing scores and judging by the Barlow Board of Advisors and guest judges.  Students not only observed the judging process first hand while assisting in the various rooms, but also had several opportunities to interact directly with these professional composers and performers during meals and breaks.  The Barlow Internship program has been a great boost to our program and we look forward to its continuation.

In connection with Laycock Center funding and School of Music Oscarson Lecture Series, Barlow funds supported a residency by LaDonna Smith, a prominent composer/performer in the experimental/improvisational world.  Smith presented an evening concert that included performances on violin and viola with faculty artist Christian Asplund and the student ensemble Group for Experimental Music (GEM).  Smith worked closely with GEM in advance of the concert, presented a lecture to the composition seminar, and also presented the School of Music Oscarson Lecture for the month of February.

Faculty:
Barlow funds continue to support worthy faculty projects and activities, as a way of increasing the profile and reputation of our area, and as a means to ensure our faculty are in the best position to instruct the students in current trends and practices.  Dr. Neil Thornock has received support, along with grants from the College of Fine Arts and Communications, for a forthcoming CD of music for saxophone(s) that will be released by PARMA records in 2011.  Dr. Christian Asplund, a noted improviser, received support to perform his own music at several venues in Amsterdam during summer 2010, including a performance on the Karnatic Lab Concert Series with BYU composer Steven Ricks.  In this vein, the composition faculty improvisation trio (ART trio)—Christian Asplund, Steven Ricks, and Neil Thornock—received support to perform at the International Society of Improvised Music (ISIM) conference at the University of Michigan Rackham School of Music in December 2010.
On a larger scale, for the final of three years ongoing, we combined our funds with other sources to send Steve Lindeman to the BMI Jazz Composers Workshop for advanced training and work shopping of his jazz compositions (examples of which one can hear on the latest CD by our faculty jazz quartet, Q’d Up 3 [Tantara 77941]).  Partly as a result of his BMI work, he says, Lindeman won a large ensemble commission for the Utah Arts Festival in summer 2009 and has been invited to the American Composers Orchestra / Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University’s Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute in summer 2010.

Even amid recessionary times, it has been a rich year for the Barlow Education Grant.  We greatly appreciate the opportunities this Endowment provides.

Intern Reports

Igor Marques
BM Music Composition

Igor Marques This experience encapsulates three of the best days I’ve ever lived. The high altitude filled my lungs with a thinner air, which was already hard to catch given the surrounding breath-taking mountains. Food was bounteous and surpassed the highest standards of my taste. The accommodations were comfortable, welcoming, and made judging a little easier to process, providing a discreet background. I couldn’t forget to mention my fellow interns: we supported each other and were amazed at how impressive everything was.

Impressive seems to me the word to describe it most suitably. Everything sit down, every chat, every listen, every joke or witty comment, every argument in favor or against, everything left a strong impression in my mind. I heard music more clearly with these people. I wasn’t able to always follow their line of thought, but I learned a great deal about how to listen to music. It helped sharpen my composition skills, because I became more aware of what the experts notice and value in a well-constructed piece. I couldn't wait to start applying all those things into my own compositions, in such a way that I took every available break in our work routine there to dissect the learning into notes and musical concepts.

It's been a week now that I the judging first began. My desire to produce good music has been boosted. In an attempt to be more worthy of the privilege of having been a Barlow intern, I've sat down many times at the piano with paper and pencil at hand. Sometimes I sat at a computer, and some other times I would just go outside and ponder under the warm rays of August and the calid western wind. It's been much harder than I thought: I had been exposed to so much good music, and such brilliant musicians, that I thought it would translate very organically into my work. And it will, probably. It's just a slow process. However, the impressions remain as strong, as indelible as ever. Being a Barlow intern has imbued my soul with this, the notion that it's worth making music, making excellent music; there are people that appreciate it and reward it; and I can be a part of it all. Thank you, Barlow Endowment, for this life-changing experience you have let me board in.

Esther Megargel
MM Music Composition

Esther MegargelBeing an intern during the three days of deliberations for the Barlow Prize and Commissions was a very rewarding experience for me. I had the opportunity to listen to excerpts from new works submitted by composers from all over the world and in a variety of genres. I was impressed by the skill and dedication of the judges, who brought their unique perspectives to the table yet came to a consensus upon the most important criteria for a winner. I listened carefully to each of their comments. They showed an excellent grasp of the totality of a piece (pacing, climactic moments, emotional content), and attention to smaller details (instrumental possibilities, articulations, layering of sounds, etc.).

I have learned that I need to increase my critical listening skills in exploring the works of other composers and in evaluating my own compositions. I have also gained a good idea of what judges are looking for in a composition contest. Good beginnings are extremely important, as there is only time to listen to a few minutes of a piece. There needs to be a golden balance between repetition and contrast. There needs to be something that grabs the listener, such as an unexpected turn of musical events, or an unusual combination of instruments. The physical score needs to be of the highest graphic and notational quality. The recording, especially, needs to be a stunning rendition by well qualified performers. MIDI recordings are frowned upon. It helps to have the track numbers clearly delineated on both the CD and the jacket. Very large sections should be broken down into smaller tracks for ease of location.

I felt that the selection of judges was excellent. The inclusion of several performers in the discussions helped the group to focus on the realities of actual presentation, and to emphasize the importance of a good working relationship between composer and performer. My experience as an intern will surely affect my future composing. I cannot help but benefit from an atmosphere in which imagination and creativity were considered the highest priorities for determining a winner. It was a privilege to be selected as an intern and to work in the beautiful setting of Snowbird. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to serve in this capacity.

Kyle Shaw
MM Music Composition

Kyle ShawWorking as an intern for the Barlow Endowment this summer will undoubtedly continue to be an invaluable experience, as it has already done in my life as a composer. In preparation for the upcoming meetings, I spent time early this summer with the other interns sorting, organizing, and processing all of the applications mailed in to the Barlow from all over the world. During the first week of August, I was privileged to retreat to a beautiful resort with the Barlow’s distinguished board of advisers and other highly estimable guest judges. As interns, [we] had the privilege of observing the judging process and the comments made by reputable composers and performers as they critiqued the music and portfolios of the Barlow’s many applicants. In an effort to increase the efficiency of the process, we handed the judges each application and operated the audio system while they listened to excerpts of each submitted work.

While I am sure that my experience as an intern with the Barlow influenced me in more ways than I am able to acknowledge, I can organize the things I learned into two general categories: I gained a firmer understanding of current merit-worthy characteristics, and [I learned] the faux pas of both how composers write music and how they present themselves via portfolio in the modern classical music world.

The pieces that most impressed the judges avoided traditional rhythmic structures, and yet each of these pieces had a very clear sense of arch, shape and form. The strongest musical ideas were focused and did not wander, and the ablest composers knew how to properly pace their presentation of these ideas. On more than one occasion, the performer-judges commented on how the weaker compositions, when played correctly, made the performers look and sound like they were messing up—certainly an aspect of writing music that composers should be cognizant of.

Some composers shot themselves in the foot when they compiled their application portfolio. Sending in an unlabeled CD without multiple tracks, failing to demonstrate that they can competently write for the proposed medium, being excessive and verbose in Bios/CVs—we encountered all of these features more than once in reviewing the applications. While they did not decide the commission recipients, these problems certainly worked against some applicants. Conversely, some of the most beautifully published, manicured portfolios contained some of the most mediocre music that the judges encountered all week. Good presentation cannot make up for lack of musical and compositional strength.

I am honored beyond measure to have participated in the wonderful work of the Barlow Endowment. It has truly been a privilege to have interacted with top-notch composers and performers who are also top-quality people.

Michael Wahlquist
BM Music Composition

Michael WahlquistMy experience this summer as an intern for the Barlow Endowment was magnificent and eye-opening in every way. It was a beautiful thing to see an organization provide such real support for new music. All of the judges are top-notch composers and performers. It was a privilege working and interacting with them. Watching the judges carefully select the best entries to the competition was very revealing for me as a young composer. Hearing their comments and critiques of the submitted works was one of the most valuable 'master-class' experiences I've had. Seeing so many pieces of new music back to back made it very clear what some of the current major trends in music are. It was also clear which pieces rose to the top in terms of craftsmanship and creativity. There were many very good works submitted, but just a few really broke free from the crowd to be truly outstanding. This gave me some wonderful insights into what it takes to make really good music. I was delighted to discover some wonderful new composers and their music. Now more than ever I feel confident in my future as a composer, aware that there is a large network of composers, musicians and many other supporters of new music. Perhaps the best thing is that I feel inspired that I too could be a serious contender in such contests, if I apply what I've learned.

Another valuable side of working with the Barlow Endowment has to do with the practical side of applying for a composition contest. It was invaluable for me to have a glimpse at the inside processes of such a competition.  As we processed the various applications early this summer, and later facilitated their judging at the resort, it was evident that some applications were well presented while others were very sloppy. Presentation matters; a neatly notated and bound score, a working recording with clearly marked tracks on both the disk and the CD case, important excerpts from the piece clearly marked on the scores and recordings. 

This experience has helped me to be a better composer and prepare for my planned career as a composer and educator. 

Personnel  

Barlow Board of Advisors

Todd ColemanTodd Coleman is the academic coordinator of the Music Technology program at Elon University in North Carolina and was recently granted tenure and promoted to associate professor. Much of Coleman’s work since joining the Elon faculty in late 2007 has focused on creating the new curriculum and facilities, and providing a strong artistic, musical and technical foundation for the new degree program and nurture its continued growth. Coleman’s recent composition activities span a wide range of styles and genres including a 20-minute flute concerto for April Clayton commissioned by the Barlow Endowment due to be released on the Tantara record label, a 13-minute work for wind ensemble commissioned by thirteen universities, a theme song written for Elon University’s current $100 million fundraising campaign called, Ever Elon, and co-writing songs in popular/commercial genres with his students. His current composition project is a large interdisciplinary/transmedia art work for chorus, amplified cello, three-screen video projection and surround sound entitled, Three Scenes in Jerusalem, which deals with glimpses into the final dramatic moments of the mortal life of Christ in Gethsemane, Golgotha, and the Garden Tomb.

Stacy GarropStacy Garrop'srecent premieres include The Lovely Sirens and The Fates of Man, (the third and fourth movements of her Mythology Symphony), commissioned by the Albany Symphony Orchestra as part of her 2009/2010 residence with the Symphony. She also received premiere performances of a co-commissioned piece entitled Frammenti by the Rembrandt Chamber Players, Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival, and Arizona State University faculty performers. Other recent performances of her work have been given by the Biava Quartet, Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble, Lincoln Trio, University of Chicago New Music Ensemble, Chicago a Cappella, South Bend Chamber Singers, and Volti.

Stacy’s Sonnets of Beauty and Music was recorded by Volti and commercially released in 2010 on Innova Records on their CD entitled “Turn the Page”; also this year, Ravello Records released Amy Briggs’ “Tangos for Piano” that included Stacy’s Teeny Tango. Cedille Records will release two recordings in 2011 containing Stacy’s works. In February, they released “In Eleanor’s Words: In Stacy’s Notes: Music of Stacy Garrop,” which contains her String Quartet No. 3: Gaia, Silver Dagger, and In Eleanor’s Words with performances by the Biava Quartet, Lincoln Trio, mezzo-soprano Buffy Baggott and pianist Kuang-Hao Huang. The second CD, to be released in the spring, is titled “Notable Women: Music by Today’s Female Composers” and will feature the Lincoln Trio’s recording of her piece SEVEN.

Stacy has previously received two grants from the Barlow Endowment.

David RakowskiDavid Rakowski(the name means quality) was the Maurice Abravanel Visiting Distinguished Composer at the University of Utah in April, and was a visiting distinguished composer at the Eastman School of Music shortly thereafter. He finished his monumental set of 100 piano études, several of which were premiered at the Bang on a Can Summer Festival and the Ohio Music Teachers Association conference in Cleveland. Pieces receiving premieres inclued “AhChim AnGae” for Korean fiddle and string trio (Pacific Rim Festival), “Double Fantasy” for piano trio (Finisterra Trio, New York City), “Étude-Fantasies” (various children’s duos, California Music Teachers Association conference, LA), “Cell’Out” (4 ‘cellos, Music From Salem, New York) and “Current Conditions”, which was commissioned by the US Marine Chamber Orchestra for a children’s concert. “Phillis Levin Songs” had its New York premiere with Judith Bettina and the New York New Music Ensemble. In the fall he was resident at Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. Three doctoral dissertations on his piano études were defended in 2010.

 

Steven Ricks 2010 has been an active and successful year for composer Steven Ricks After directing the BYU Paris Study Abroad Program in January - April, a BYU Kennedy Center Research Grant allowed him to pursue composition projects in Belfast and Amsterdam. In Belfast he had a brief residency at the Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC) at Queen’s University, Belfast, which included an evening concert of his music and the music of BYU Alum John Moeller as part of the SONORITIES festival. Activities in Amsterdam included a performance on the Karnatic Lab concert series with Christian Asplund and Lara Candland, and rehearsals and initial plans with the quartet Hexnut for an upcoming commission scheduled for premiere in May 2011. Towards the end of the year he worked on two commissioned works due for premieres in 2011: Medusa in Fragments for pianist Keith Kirchoff, plus video and surround sound; and Piece for Mixed Quartet for the NOVA Chamber Music Series. In December 2010 Ricks received notification that he was the recipient of a 2010 Fromm Music Foundation Commission, to write a new work for the Talujon Percussion Quartet.

Ethan Wickman2010 marked the release of two recordings of Ethan Wickman’s music. Angles of Repose was recorded by the Zeitgeist New Music Ensemble on Innova, and Namasté for String Quartet (a Barlow-commissioned work) was recorded by the Avalon String Quartet for Albany. In the coming year, Wickman’s piano music, as performed by Nicholas Phillips will be the exclusive content of a CD released by Albany records. Other current projects include works to be recorded by violinist Scott Conklin, and Euphoniumist Steven Mead. As winner of the 2011 Chamber Music Commission from the Utah Arts Festival, a new work will be composed for the 2011 festival. Wickman also received recognition as a nominee for the Orpheus 440 Project, in addition to being long-listed for a Grammy nomination in the “Best Contemporary Classical Composition Category” for Angles of Repose.

Barlow Guest Judges

Laurie Baefsky

 

Laurie baefsky
Imani Winds
Logan, UT


 

Keith Bradshaw

 

Keith Bradshaw
Southern Utah University
Cedar City, UT

 

 

 

April Clayton

 

April Clayton
Orpheus Winds
Provo, UT

 

 

 

Adam Marks

 

Adam Marks
Fifth House
Evanston, IL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BACK TO TOP

 

 

 

2010 Barlow Winners

Barlow Prize Winner
Dan Visconti
Dan Visconti

The Barlow Endowment for Music Composition at Brigham Young University takes pleasure in announcing commission winners for 2010.  After reviewing 326 composer applications from 31 countries worldwide, the judging panel awarded Dan Visconti of Arlington, Virginia, the $12,000 Barlow Prize to compose a major new work for piano trio.  The judging panel also granted Justin Dello Joio of New York City the distinction of Honorable Mention in this competition.

Mr. Visconti has a graduate composition degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music and took additional studies at the Yale School of Music.  His composition teachers include Zhou Long, Margaret Brouwer, Aaron Kernis, and Ezra Laderman.  A past recipient of a Barlow Endowment commission, his extensive list of awards, residencies, commissions, and fellowships includes (among many others) the Fromm Foundation at Harvard, Berlin Prize, Meet the Composer, BMI Foundation, American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Aaron Copland Award.  For more information, please click here.

General Commission Recipients
Michael gandolfi Melrose Symphony Orchestra
Eric Chasalow
Talea Ensemble
Augusta Read Thomas
New Haven Symphony
Gregg Wramage
Brett Deubner
David Sanford
Lara Downes
LDS Commission Recipients
Lansing McLoskey
Triton Brass
Jesse Jones
Cornell University
joseph Sowa
Eric Hansen
Seth Stewart
Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble

In considering 117 applications in our General and LDS commissioning programs the Endowment granted $55,000 to nine composers who will write works for the following ensembles and musicians: Michael Gandolfi (Melrose Symphony Orchestra); Eric Chasalow (Talea Ensemble); Augusta Read Thomas (New Haven Symphony); Lansing McLoskey (Triton Brass); Gregg Wramage (Brett Deubner–violist); David Sanford (Lara Downes–pianist); Jesse Jones (Cornell University Winds); Joseph Sowa (Eric Hansen–string bass); Seth Stewart (Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble)

The judging panel included the Endowment’s Board of Advisors:  Steven Ricks, David Rakowski, Ethan Wickman, Todd Coleman, and Stacy Garrop. Newell Dayley served as a guest judge in the deliberations.  Monte Belknap, Lois Shapiro, and Paul Frehner represented the Deseret, Triple Helix, and Gryphon piano trios.  These three ensembles comprise the Endowment’s performing consortium who will premiere the new work in 2012.

The Endowment wishes to thank all composers and ensembles who applied for commissions.  Because of limited resources and difficult economic times, the Endowment regrets that many deserving composers and their projects went unfunded this year.  Next year’s Barlow Prize will feature a woodwind quintet.  You should receive information regarding the details after the first of the year.

2010 News

Avalon String Quartet at BYU

Avalon String Quartet

The Avalon String Quartet performed at BYU on Oct. 28 & 29, 2010. The performance was held as part of the BYU Performing Art Series 2010-2011. They performed an evening filled with new works on Oct. 28, and traditional repertoire on Oct. 29.

 

Their performance is sponsored by the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition, and the Laycock Center for Creative Collaboration in the Arts.

 

 

Renowned Improv Violinist Performs at BYU

LaDonna SmithLaDonna Smith, violist and composer, performed at Brigham Young University on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2010. Her visit was a collaborative project funded by the Barlow Endowment, the BYU School of Music, the Laycock Center for Creative Collaboration in the Arts, and the Oscarson Music Lecture Series.

Smith has created a style of improvisation on violin and viola that is uniquely her own. Alternating classical and extended techniques, she explores her instrument, painting scenarios and sound pictures as she plays. She has performed at practically every major improvisation festival and many of the New Music Festivals. She has toured Europe on numerous occasions, playing solo and in collaboration with local musicians. Her travels have taken her to the former USSR, Siberia, and Japan.

Naxos Releases Harold Meltzer Recordings

Harold MeltzerNaxos has released digital and CD recordings of four works by Barlow Prize Winner Harold Meltzer.

The works included in the recording were his Barlow Prize piece, Brion, as well as Sindbad, Two Songs from Silas Marner, and Exiles. Harold Meltzer stated that the pieces were “given spectacular performances by the Cygnus Ensemble, the Peabody Trio, by Elizabeth Farnum and Greg Hesselink, and by my own group Sequitur with Richard Lalli.”

Speaking about the new recording, Anthony Tammasini of the New York Times said, “Brion....is a haunting, quirky and continually inventive chamber work for a small ensemble....It receives an elegant, colorful performance on a splendid recording of four fascinating chamber and vocal works by Mr. Meltzer.”

In October 2010, Naxos released the recording in CD format. These works are currently available for download as well as on CD.

Harold Meltzer’s Pulitzer Prize-finalist work, Brion was performed by The Cygnus Ensemble on February 26, 2010 at Bargemusic in Brooklyn, New York. The program premiered by Mario Davidovsky, Charles Wuorinen, Mohammed Fairouz, and others.

To view a complete list and to listen to the recordings, click here.

Premieres and Performances  

Justin Dello JoioJustin Dello Joio’s Barlow commission Due per Due was performed by Carter Brey and Christopher O’Riley December 19, 2010. The piece was performed at the Kravis Center for Performing Arts in West Palm Beach, FL. In an article written by Greg Stepanich for the Palm Beach Daily News, Due Per Due was described as a “piece that makes severe technical demands, but rewards the effort with a dramatic first movement that has an emotional heart of significant power, and a second movement of non-stop calisthenics and high excitement.” An additional review written for the Palm Beach ArtsPaper called the piece, “a worthy new work that deserves to be added to the programs of ambitious cellists looking for something new to add to their solo programs.” To view the articles in full, click the links below:
Palm Beach Daily News click here.
Palm Beach ArtsPaper click here.

Ronald Bruce SmithThe Del Sol String Quartet performed the premiere of Ronald Bruce Smith's Barlow commission String Quartet no. 3 on November 13, 2010 at Yerba Buena Center for the Performing Arts in San Francisco, California. The piece was performed again November 15, 2010 at The Dance Palace in Point Reyes Station, California; November 19, 2010 at Samovar Hall in Mountain View, California; and April 25, 2011 at the Cutting Edge Concerts New Music Festival, Symphony Space in New York, New York.

Daniel BradshawDaniel Bradshaw's Movements for Violin and Piano, a work commissioned by the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition, was premiered by violinist Ignace Jang and pianist Jonathan Korth on October 28th, 2010 at the Orvis Auditorium, University of Hawaii-Manoa campus.

Daniel AsiaNonet, a Barlow commissioned piece by Daniel Asia premiered October 10, 2010 in San Francisco, CA. It was performed by Czech Nonet. An additional performance took place on October 13, 2010 in Tucson, AZ. The piece is scheduled to be recorded with Czech Nonet on April 10, 2011 in the Czech Republic.


Christopher RouseChristopher Rouse's
Barlow commission String Quartet No. 3 was premiered on June 18, 2010 in New Haven, CT by The Calder Quartet. It was also performed on August 20, 2010 in La Jolla, CA.

 

Matthew BarnsonSospiro Winds premiered Matthew Barnson's Barlow commission Wind Quintet (2008) May 21, 2010 at Christ and St. Stephen's Church in New York City.

 

Benjamin Sabey Benjamin Sabey's Barlow commission, InParadisum, had it's premiere May 1 and 2, 2010 in the Mandeville Auditorium at University of California San Diego (UCSD). The piece was performed by the La Jolla Symphony.

Dai Fujikura
International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) premiered Dai Fujikura's Barlow commission ICE on April 27, 2010 at le Poisson Rouge in New York. The piece was conducted by Matthias Pintscher. ICE performed the piece an additional time on September 11, 2010 at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.

Joshua HarrisJoshua Harris' Barlow commission, The Wanderer, premiered April 21, 2010 in Boone, NC. The piece was performed by the Appalachian State University Wind Ensemble.

 

Neil ThornockCorrugated Refrains, a Barlow commissioned piece composed by Neil Thornock premiered in the Kopleff Recital Hall at Georgia State University on April 20, 2010. The piece was performed by clarinetist Kenneth Long.

Christian GentryBenjamin Sung and Jihye Chang performed Christian Gentry's Barlow Commissioned piece, Flux Flummoxed, on April 19, 2010. It was performed in the Gaede Theater at Minnesota State University Moorhead.

Stephen AndersonStephen Anderson's Barlow commission Dysfunctional was performed by pianist Stephen Harlos, accompanied by the University of North Carolina Symphony Orchestra. It was premiered April 13, 2010 in the Memorial Hall at the University of North Carolina.

Scott WheelerScott Wheeler's Barlow commission, Spirit Geometry premiered February 28, 2010 at the Slosberg Recital Hall at Brandeis University in Waltham, MA. The performers were cellist Joshua Gordon and pianist Randall Hodgkinson. The peice was also performed on September 17, 2010 by cellist Jesus Castro-Balbi and pianist Gloria Lin. In a review of this piece, David Perkins of the Boston Globe said that, “...what we hear is a sparkling, inventive, and well-wrought piece, in four movements, that deserves to be heard often.” In addition, he explains that Wheelers piece “is engaging from the first to last bar” (click here for full article). Vance R. Koven of the Boston Music Intelligencer described that, “the sonata explores different ranges and performance modes, without at all appearing as a technical exercise...” and “One’s overall impression is that this is a very strong work that will survive and reward repeated hearing...” To read the full article, click here.

Reports

Executive Director Report
Thomas Durham
Executive Director
Barlow Endowment for Music Composition
Tom Durham

Now in its 28th year of operations, the Barlow Endowment enjoys a worldwide reputation as one ofthe premier sources of funding for composers who create new art music. In the last decade alone, the Endowment has awarded over $130,000 to ten Barlow Prize-winners, each of whom survived formidable competition in our flagship commissioning program. Barlow Prize awards have ranged from $10,000-$20,000. Composers have written new works for choir, orchestra, band, string quartet, and other chamber ensembles. The wide variety of ensembles with which the Endowment partners not only for the Barlow Prize, but for all our commissioning programs represents one of our greatest assets. Global interest in the Barlow Prize continues to expand, and the stature of this award has exceeded original expectations. Hundreds of composers continue to enter this prestigious annual international competition. Since 2001, over 3,000 composers have submitted materials for the Barlow Prize representing dozens of countries from every continent. We typically process an average of 320 applications each year.

As an agency that awards the creation of new compositions, the Endowment may stand alone in this respect: We only award composers for works not yet written with the guaranteed promise of performance. In the case of the Barlow Prize, we arrange for multiple premieres. This “multiple premiere” concept adds weight to the unveiling of a major new work, and launches it in a broader manner than the usual single performance typical of so many new works. For our GENERAL and LDS commissioning programs, a fundamental part of the application requires composers to provide documentation from artists and ensembles promising to support and premiere the work. These two ingredients, the creation of new music with a guaranteed performance combine to form the backbone of the Endowment’s raison d’etre.

In addition to funding composers, the Barlow Endowment’s Education Grants program supports and nurtures composition students at Brigham Young University’s School of Music. Besides scholarships and exposure to the world of modern music, we support an internship program that allows selected students to participate at important annual meetings and judging sessions each summer.

Finally, without the support of Brigham Young University, and the hard work of dedicated staff, advisors, directors, and the Barlow family, the Endowment’s successess simply would not happen.

Michael HicksAnnual Education Report
Michael Hicks
Professor of Music, Division Coordinator - Composition / Music Theory
School of Music, BYU

Students:
We always devote a large share of our funding to scholarships, Barlow-meeting internships, student-performer fees (for composition classes), and travel support for student composers to hear their works performed-as was the case, most notably, with Ben Taylor, who used combined awards to travel (along with faculty performer Eric Hansen) to Penn State for some additional score preparation and the premiere of his first-place award-winning work FE26 at the International Society of Bassists conference in June.  That resulted in new commissions for Ben and the ongoing promotion of his piece by the society (see http://www.isbstore.com/fe26--ben-tayl26.html ).

But we also support student education and achievement via the guest residencies we arrange.  This year those included visits by the fantastic US Coast Guard Saxophone Quartet as well as two legendary figures in the experimental / improvisational world. For the former we had to provide very little (local travel, food) since they are funded principally by the Department of Defense—yes, “the common defense” includes traveling the nation to perform new music!  This group performed not only two amazingly virtuosic works by Thornock, but also rehearsed and recorded new student compositions, now firmly entrenched in those students’ audio portfolios.  Meanwhile, assisted by Laycock funding as well as the Barlow funds, we brought composer-performers Stuart Dempster (trombone) and Malcolm Goldstein (violin) for separate brief residencies with our Group for Experimental Music.  They not only taught our composition students generally, but also coached GEM brilliantly in common techniques of non-idiomatic (i.e., “free”) improvisation and the aesthetics and practices of experimental music.  All this is not to mention their daily inspiring tales of life on the “tone roads” of working avant-gardists in the 1960s and beyond. 

Faculty
As you know, the tools of the compositional trade continue to evolve: recordings and scores thrive more online than in hard copy.  So the older copying and mailing costs dwindle, though compositional software and studio recording costs continue, as do production costs for CDs—our “audio brochures”—that feature our faculty’s music.  This year we funded studio work for Steven Ricks and also sessions for a new compilation of Christian Asplund’s complete organ music (performed by Thornock).  We expect actual products in hand in the coming year.
 
Meanwhile, we were able to provide Ricks, Asplund, and Thornock with travel support for premieres.  On a larger scale, for the second of three years ongoing, we combined our funds with other sources to send Steve Lindeman to the BMI Jazz Composers Workshop for advanced training and work shopping of his jazz compositions (examples of which one can hear on the latest CD by our faculty jazz quartet, Q’d Up 3 [Tantara 77941]).  Partly as a result of his BMI work, he says, Lindeman won a large ensemble commission for the Utah Arts Festival in summer 2009 and has been invited to the American Composers Orchestra / Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University’s Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute in summer 2010.

Even amid recessionary times, it has been a rich year for the Barlow Education Grant.  Already 2010 looks as promising, if not more so.  Stay tuned

Intern Report

Curtis SmithCurtis Smith
MA Music Composition

Being a Barlow intern this summer was a great experience on many levels. The first thing that happened during the short time assisting with the endowment was a creative recharge. All summer I had been working and traveling and my composing had really taken a hit. I felt drained and not at all ready to head into a new school year. Each day that I worked as an intern I felt a surge of ideas and optimism about composing. It was the perfect boost.

Along with coming away charged up, I gleaned valuable insight into composing music in the 21st century. I saw music that was weak and lacked the forward motion of a strong idea. I saw music that was “square” and predictable. I also saw music that was fresh and convincingly entertaining and composers I will follow up on and learn from. As I watched all this music pass through the judges’ hands I reflected on my composing and saw some areas for improvement.

As an intern I also learned the practical necessities of entering competitions. Things like the necessity of a neat score, real performance (not midi), track titles on the CD case as well as the CD, etc. were deeply engrained after a hundred or so applicants. I will keep all of this in mind as I enter my works into competitions in the future.

It was a great experience and a real privilege to help with such a large competition. Working with the composers, performers, and my peers was inspiring. I left this experience with lots of energy and excitement. Thank you for the opportunity.

Zacharay Van HoutenZacharay Van Houten
MA Music Composition

When I first was given the opportunity to be an intern for the Barlow Endowment, I didn’t quite know what to expect. When they explained that we would do typical intern things such as data entry, filing, and catering to the judges’ needs, I remember thinking that this wouldn’t be exactly the most fun and exciting thing. However, this internship was far more than these typical intern duties.

The filing of applications was actually quite enjoyable. I was surprised to see so many big names, names of composers that I have studied and to whom I look for inspiration. In addition to these, there were so many applications from outside the United States. This is when I began realizing how special this endowment really is.

The Barlow Endowment for Music Composition is a first-class competition. This was my first thought as we began the judging of the pieces early August. The judges are top-notch and their judging is fair and very professional. Being present for the judging was an exciting and revealing experience. There was an energy that was felt throughout the entire process and the judging never became boring or monotonous. The competition was tough and intense, and in the end, I believe that we really did find the most deserving person for the prize.

This internship was a once-in-a-lifetime experience that I could not find anywhere else. I learned not only how to properly enter a competition, but also how to be competitive. Hearing the comments from the judges was pure gold and I absorbed as much of what was going on as I could. I feel so much more prepared and able to compete.

Though there can only be one winner every year for the prize and a few commissions handed out, I learned that the remaining applications do not go unnoticed. Some of the judges happened to be performers and were interested in a lot of pieces that came along. They took note with intentions of getting in touch with the composers to purchase their piece or to even commission them separately with other funds they have or know of. It can never hurt to simply apply.

I am so appreciative of this opportunity. It has been a priceless experience that I am positive will have a huge impact on my life and my future in music.

Hayley WeightHayley Weight
BM Music Composition

Participating as an intern with the Barlow Endowment opened my eyes to the some of the opportunities available in the world of composition. I will always be very grateful for the experiences I have had as a Barlow intern.

As I started organizing applications on my first day as an intern, I was amaze at the diversity of the applications. So many composers from many different countries and backgrounds submitted applications. I was intrigued and excited to hear these new compositions, but I was also curious to see how each composition would measure up in the final round of judging.

The first morning of judging was an enlightening experience. I loved listening to each piece and then hearing great musicians and composers share their comments about the piece. I heard many great pieces of music, and the many different backgrounds that I saw in the applications showed through in the diversity of the music. It was one of the best experiences I have had as a student to be able to hear great music and then listen to the judges talk about things that a composer did well and things that they could have changed to make their pieces better. I learned a lot of new things that will help me to improve my own music.

It was also a great experience to get to know the composers and musicians that were there. I loved being in the same room with so many great minds. As I listened to them discuss each piece, I learned about the value of having different perspectives. Each judge brought their own perspective to the table and sometimes had very different ideas about the music. I learned something new about music from every person that was there.

This experience motivated me, taught me and gave me a great appreciation of the people I was honored to associate with during my time spent as an intern. I would like to thank the Barlow Endowment so much for this opportunity.

Mark WitmerMark Witmer
BM Music Composition

My time as an intern for the Barlow Endowment was enormously helpful for me as a student and composer. I was able to interact personally with the experienced composers and performers who participated in the competition as judges, and I also had the privilege of studying musical submissions from composers around the world. The study of music often takes on a rather historical flavor. Consequently, this detailed exposure to the contemporary scene was invaluable. In particular, I appreciated the personal attention and advice I received from many of the judges. It is gratifying to feel the sense of community that exists in the world of new music. The support that comes from this is very helpful as we all seek to enrich the lives of others with our music.

Personnel  

Barlow Board of Advisors

Todd ColemanTodd Coleman is the academic coordinator of the Music Technology program at Elon University in North Carolina and was recently granted tenure and promoted to associate professor. Much of Coleman’s work since joining the Elon faculty in late 2007 has focused on creating the new curriculum and facilities, and providing a strong artistic, musical and technical foundation for the new degree program and nurture its continued growth. Coleman’s recent composition activities span a wide range of styles and genres including a 20-minute flute concerto for April Clayton commissioned by the Barlow Endowment due to be released on the Tantara record label, a 13-minute work for wind ensemble commissioned by thirteen universities, a theme song written for Elon University’s current $100 million fundraising campaign called, Ever Elon, and co-writing songs in popular/commercial genres with his students. His current composition project is a large interdisciplinary/transmedia art work for chorus, amplified cello, three-screen video projection and surround sound entitled, Three Scenes in Jerusalem, which deals with glimpses into the final dramatic moments of the mortal life of Christ in Gethsemane, Golgotha, and the Garden Tomb.

Stacy GarropStacy Garrop's recent premieres include The Lovely Sirens and The Fates of Man, (the third and fourth movements of her Mythology Symphony), commissioned by the Albany Symphony Orchestra as part of her 2009/2010 residence with the Symphony. She also received premiere performances of a co-commissioned piece entitled Frammenti by the Rembrandt Chamber Players, Chesapeake Chamber Music Festival, and Arizona State University faculty performers. Other recent performances of her work have been given by the Biava Quartet, Dinosaur Annex Music Ensemble, Lincoln Trio, University of Chicago New Music Ensemble, Chicago a Cappella, South Bend Chamber Singers, and Volti.

Stacy’s Sonnets of Beauty and Music was recorded by Volti and commercially released in 2010 on Innova Records on their CD entitled “Turn the Page”; also this year, Ravello Records released Amy Briggs’ “Tangos for Piano” that included Stacy’s Teeny Tango. Cedille Records will release two recordings in 2011 containing Stacy’s works. In February, they released “In Eleanor’s Words: In Stacy’s Notes: Music of Stacy Garrop,” which contains her String Quartet No. 3: Gaia, Silver Dagger, and In Eleanor’s Words with performances by the Biava Quartet, Lincoln Trio, mezzo-soprano Buffy Baggott and pianist Kuang-Hao Huang. The second CD, to be released in the spring, is titled “Notable Women: Music by Today’s Female Composers” and will feature the Lincoln Trio’s recording of her piece SEVEN.

Stacy has previously received two grants from the Barlow Endowment.

David RakowskiDavid Rakowski (the name means quality) was the Maurice Abravanel Visiting Distinguished Composer at the University of Utah in April, and was a visiting distinguished composer at the Eastman School of Music shortly thereafter. He finished his monumental set of 100 piano études, several of which were premiered at the Bang on a Can Summer Festival and the Ohio Music Teachers Association conference in Cleveland. Pieces receiving premieres inclued “AhChim AnGae” for Korean fiddle and string trio (Pacific Rim Festival), “Double Fantasy” for piano trio (Finisterra Trio, New York City), “Étude-Fantasies” (various children’s duos, California Music Teachers Association conference, LA), “Cell’Out” (4 ‘cellos, Music From Salem, New York) and “Current Conditions”, which was commissioned by the US Marine Chamber Orchestra for a children’s concert. “Phillis Levin Songs” had its New York premiere with Judith Bettina and the New York New Music Ensemble. In the fall he was resident at Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. Three doctoral dissertations on his piano études were defended in 2010.

 

Steven Ricks 2010 has been an active and successful year for composer Steven Ricks After directing the BYU Paris Study Abroad Program in January - April, a BYU Kennedy Center Research Grant allowed him to pursue composition projects in Belfast and Amsterdam. In Belfast he had a brief residency at the Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC) at Queen’s University, Belfast, which included an evening concert of his music and the music of BYU Alum John Moeller as part of the SONORITIES festival. Activities in Amsterdam included a performance on the Karnatic Lab concert series with Christian Asplund and Lara Candland, and rehearsals and initial plans with the quartet Hexnut for an upcoming commission scheduled for premiere in May 2011. Towards the end of the year he worked on two commissioned works due for premieres in 2011: Medusa in Fragments for pianist Keith Kirchoff, plus video and surround sound; and Piece for Mixed Quartet for the NOVA Chamber Music Series. In December 2010 Ricks received notification that he was the recipient of a 2010 Fromm Music Foundation Commission, to write a new work for the Talujon Percussion Quartet.

Ethan Wickman2010 marked the release of two recordings of Ethan Wickman’s music. Angles of Repose was recorded by the Zeitgeist New Music Ensemble on Innova, and Namasté for String Quartet (a Barlow-commissioned work) was recorded by the Avalon String Quartet for Albany. In the coming year, Wickman’s piano music, as performed by Nicholas Phillips will be the exclusive content of a CD released by Albany records. Other current projects include works to be recorded by violinist Scott Conklin, and Euphoniumist Steven Mead. As winner of the 2011 Chamber Music Commission from the Utah Arts Festival, a new work will be composed for the 2011 festival. Wickman also received recognition as a nominee for the Orpheus 440 Project, in addition to being long-listed for a Grammy nomination in the “Best Contemporary Classical Composition Category” for Angles of Repose.

Barlow Guest Judges

Monte Belknap

 

Monte Belknap
Deseret Piano Trio
Provo, UT


K. Newell Dayley

 

K. Newell Dayley
Provo, UT

 

Paul Frehner

 

Paul Frehner
Gryphon Trio
London, ON

 

Lois Shapiro

 

Lois Shapiro
Triple Helix
Watertown, MA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BACK TO TOP


2009 Barlow Winners

Barlow Prize Winner
Benjamin Ellin

The Barlow Endowment for Music Composition at Brigham Young University takes pleasure in announcing commission winners for 2009, celebrating the Endowment's 25th annniversary.

After reviewing 209 composer applications from 19 countries worldwide, the judging panel awarded Benjamin Ellin from London, England, the $20,000 Barlow Prize to compose a major new trombone concerto.  The judging panel also granted Enrico Chapela from Mexico City, Mexico, the distinction of Honorable Mention in this competition.

Born in 1980, Mr. Ellin graduated from London's Guildhall School of Music and Drama in 2002.  Recent composition projects include his Tafahum, a concerto for Ney and Orchestra; a major viola work for Rivka Golani; a setting of Akhmatova poems; and Ellin's first opera Welcome to Deen.  Mr Ellin also enjoys an active conducting career and currently serves as Artistic Director and Principal Conductor of Every Music For EveryBody (EMFEB).  In 2007, he won the highest prize from the Evgeny Svetlanov International Conducting Competition in Luxembourg.  His other musical interests include links with youth orchestras, composer collaborations, and world music cultures.  If you want to see Benjamin Ellin's website, please click here.

LDS Commission Recipients
Stephen Anderson
Steven Harlos and the University of North Carolina Symphony
Joshua Harris
Appalachian State University Wind Ensemble
Benjamin Sabey
La Jolla Symphony
General Commission Recipients
Claude Baker
Marc-Andre Hamelin Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra
Yu-Hui Chang
Lois Shapiro and the
Triple Helix Piano Trio
Brian Current
Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony
Sebastian Currier
Paul Dresher Ensemble
Pierre Jalbert
Emerson String Quartet
Missy Mazzoli
Chamber Players of the League of Composers

In considering 117 applications in our General and LDS commissioning programs the Endowment granted $45,000 to the following eight composers who will write works for the indicated ensembles and musicians: Brian Current (Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony); Pierre Jalbert (Emerson String Quartet); Yu-Hui Chang (Lois Shapiro and the Triple Helix Piano Trio); Missy Mazzoli (Chamber Players of the League of Composers); Sebastian Currier (Paul Dresher Ensemble); Benjamin Sabey (La Jolla Symphony); Stephen Anderson (University of North Carolina Symphony and Steven Harlos, pianist); Joshua Harris (Appalachian State University Wind Ensemble); and Claude Baker (Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra).

The judging panel consisted of the Endowment's Board of Advisors: Daniel Gawthrop, Steven Ricks, David Rakowski, and Ethan Wickman. Guest judges included Neil Thornock and John Costa. Joseph Alessi, principal trombonist with the New York Philharmonic, and Kory Katseanes, director of the Brigham Young University Philharmonic joined in the judging of the Barlow Prize, representing the musical forces that will premiere Mr. Ellin's new trombone concerto in April 2011.

We wish to thank all composers and ensembles for submitting thoughtful applications to the Endowment. Like most arts organizations, we did not escape the recent worldwide downturn in the economy.  This year's limited resources reduced award amounts and narrowed the number of commissions.  Consequently, several deserving composers and compelling proposals went unfunded.  Next year's Barlow Prize will feature a new work for piano trio.  You should receive our annual poster with details after the first of the year.

News

Saxophone Quartet Records Student Works

US Coast Guard Saxophone QuartetThe U.S. Coast Guard Saxophone Quartet visited BYU during the last week of September 2009.  While at BYU, the Coast Guard Saxophone Quartet premiered a piece by BYU faculty member Neil Thornock, and made a recording of some of his pieces as well as those composed by students.  
  
The quartet has appeared regularly at national and international conferences and, as the Element Quartet, won prizes in the 2004 and 2006 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition.

Trombonist Performs With BYU Faculty and Group for Experimental Music

Stuart DempsterAcclaimed contemporary trombonist and composer Stuart Dempster appeared in concert at BYU and also presented his music to the composition seminar. 

With funding from the Barlow Endowment, as well as the Laycock Center and the BYU School of Music, Dempster visited BYU campus from September 15-17, 2009. On Septemeber 15 he met with the composition seminar, presenting his music to students and faculty.

On the 17th, Dempster appeared in concert with Barlow Commission recipient and faculty artist Christian Asplund and the Group for Experimental Music, a virtuoso student ensemble specializing in spontaneous and collaborative music making.

American Academy of Arts and Letters inducts Augusta Read Thomas

Augusta Read ThomasThe American Academy of Arts and Letters has elected Augusta Read Thomas to membership.  She was inducted in May 2009.  

Thomas is the Director of the Festival of Contemporary Music at the Tanglewood Music Center and is a Professor Emeritus and former Wyatt Professor of Music Composition at Northwestern University and Professor Emeritus from the Eastman School of Music.

The American Academy of Arts and Letters is an honor society of 250 architects, composers, artists, and writers. The honor of election is considered the highest formal recognition of artistic merit in the United States.

Barlow Prize Winner named finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in Music

Harold MeltzerBarlow Prize Winner Harold Meltzer was announced as a finalist for the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in Music for his piece Brion, which was commissioned by the Barlow Endowment and premiered on April 23, 2008 at Merkin Hall in New York City.

The title comes from sculptor and architect Carlo Scarpa's Brion-Vega cemetery in northern Italy.  Meltzer's work was conceived during his year at the American Academy in Rome.

"[Brion] is a sonic portrait of a cemetery in northern Italy painted with the touch of a watercolorist and marked by an episodic structure and vivid playfulness that offer a graceful, sensual and contemplative experience," reads The Pulitzer Prizes Web site.

Musical America names Christopher Rouse 2009 Composer of the Year

Christopher RouseChristopher Rouse was named the Composer of the Year, according to the March 2009 edition of Musical America.

According to Musical America, "Few composers have written as skillfully for orchestra as Christopher Rouse. His self-described 'off-the-wall inventiveness' has thrilled audiences worldwide."

Rouse was the recipient of a 2008 Barlow General Commission.

Past Barlow Commission Recipient receives 2009 Aaron Copland Award

Geoffrey GordonGeoffrey Gordon was announced as one of nine composers to receive a 2009 Aaron Copland Award.  This award includes an all expense paid term as composer-in-residence at the historic Copland home during the 2009 season. 

Gordon, who was commissioned by the Barlow Endowment in 2004, has done a variety of work, including orchestral and chamber music, vocal and instrumental, as well as scores for theater, film and dance. His music has been called “brilliant” (Philadelphia Inquirer), “stunning” (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel), “wonderfully idiomatic” (Salt Lake Tribune), “haunting” (Strings Magazine) and “remarkable” (Fanfare).

Premieres and Performances

Christopher TignorChristopher Tignor's
2007 Barlow commission, Together Into This Unknowable Night, for the Brooklyn Rider String Quartet premiered on November 24, 2009 as part of the Five Boroughs Music Festival in New York City. The performance was held at the Dean Project in Long Island City, Queens, NYC.

Christian AsplundChristian Asplund's Barlow commission Time and Eternity premiered on October 20, 2009 at Brigham Young University. The piece was performed by Gamelan Bintang Wahyu with Asplund accompanying on the violin as part of a concert dedicated to new music.

David VayoDavid Vayo's Barlow commission Awakening of the Heart was performed as part of the Utah Art's Festival on June 27, 2009.

The piece, which Vayo dedicated to his wife Marie-Susanne, premiered in April 2006 by the New York New Music Ensemble and has been performed by the Sher Jie Ensemble of the Sichuan Conservatory of Music in China and the faculty piano trio of Ohio State University.

An additional performance of the piece took place on December 7, 2008 at the Center for New Music in the University of Iowa School of Music.

Steven MackeySteven Mackey’s piece Slide was premiered by eighth blackbird on June 12, 2009 at the Ojai Music Festival. The performance took place at the Libbey Bowl, in Ojai, California.

 

Alvin SingletonAlvin Singleton’s new commissioned piece, After Choice, premiered on June 10, 2009 at the Miller Theater at Columbia University in New York City. It was performed by the League of Composers Orchestra.


Eric MoeThe Boston Modern Orchestra Project premiered Eric Moe's
Barlow commission, Kick & Ride, a concerto for drumset and orchestra, on May 22, 2009. The piece was performed at New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall in Boston, Massachusetts.

Michael GandolfiMichael Gandolfi's Barlow Endowment commissioned piece, History of the World in Seven Acts premiered on May 1, 2009 at the Tsai Performance Center in Boston, Massachusetts. The piece was performed by Boston Musica Viva, with Richard Pittman conducting.

Lawrence MossLawrence Moss’ Barlow Commission, New Paths premiered on March 28, 2009 in the Terrace Theatre at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Additional information on the premiere is still pending.

Seung-Ah OhSeung-Ah Oh's Barlow Commission, Fragments, was premiered on March 27, 2009 at the Tenri Cultural Institution in New York. It was performed by Flexible Music.

 

 


Reports

Executive Director Report
Thomas Durham
Executive Director
Barlow Endowment for Music Composition

This year we celebrated our 25th anniversary of the Barlow Prize with a $20,000 competition—the highest dollar amount ever awarded by the agency.  A national judging panel chose the winner in August 2009, Harold Meltzer, who is composing a new trombone concerto to be premiered in 2011 by Brigham Young University’s Philharmonic Orchestra.  Arguably one of the greatest trombonists in the world, Joe Alessi, principal trombonist with the New York Philharmonic, will be our special guest soloist on that occasion.  This represents the first collaboration between Mr. Alessi and the Barlow Endowment. 

The economic downturn of the past two years has forced the arts community to grapple with their financial security and survival.  Endowment investment portfolios have not returned to former levels. As individual and corporate donations dwindle, state arts budgets encounter cutbacks. Consequently, several arts organizations have come face-to-face with the distressing possibility of failure. Just look at the venerable institution of major American orchestras as an example. The Honolulu Orchestra declared bankruptcy and is now undergoing a restructuring. Orchestras in Charlotte and Baltimore recently peered into this abyss, only to be rescued at the last minute by their communities. Other orchestras have squeezed all they can from their musicians and staff, yet still find survival imperiled.

Although the Barlow Endowment’s operations differ from an orchestra’s, each relies on the earnings of an invested, principal corpus. In the Endowment’s case, we depend entirely on that resource. As with all arts organizations, the Barlow has felt the sting of stretched resources.

Still, through careful financial management, a supportive home at Brigham Young University, and the generosity of board members, professional musicians, and staff, the Endowment’s status remains surprisingly stable. We do not face bankruptcy, the elimination of any of our commissioning programs for composers, or a cessation of any other of our operations.  On the contrary, the Endowment's reputation continues to spread, and I sense a genuine excitement for our upcoming 2010 Barlow Prize competition for a new piano trio. You will find information regarding details for this and our other commissioning programs elsewhere on this web site.

Education Report
Michael Hicks
Division Coordinator
Composition/Theory
School of Music, BYU

Students:
We always devote a large share of our funding to scholarships, Barlow-meeting internships, student-performer fees (for composition classes), and travel support for student composers to hear their works performed--as was the case, most notably, with Ben Taylor, who used combined awards to travel (along with faculty performer Eric Hansen) to Penn State for some additional score preparation and the premiere of his first-place award-winning work FE26 at the International Society of Bassists conference in June.  That resulted in new commissions for Ben and the ongoing promotion of his piece by the society (see http://www.isbstore.com/fe26--ben-tayl26.html ).

But we also support student education and achievement via the guest residencies we arrange.  This year, those included, which this year included visits by the fantastic US Coast Guard Saxophone Quartet as well as two legendary figures in the experimental / improvisational world. For the former we had to provide very little (local travel, food) since they are funded principally by the Department of Defense—yes, “the common defense” includes traveling the nation to perform new music!  This group performed not only two amazingly virtuosic works by Thornock, but also rehearsed and recorded new student compositions, now firmly entrenched in those students’ audio portfolios.  Meanwhile, assisted by Laycock funding as well as the Barlow funds, we brought composer-performers Stuart Dempster (trombone) and Malcolm Goldstein (violin) for separate brief residencies with our Group for Experimental Music.  They not only taught our composition students generally, but also coached GEM brilliantly in common techniques of non-idiomatic (i.e., “free”) improvisation and the aesthetics and practices of experimental music.  All this is not to mention their daily inspiring tales of life on the “tone roads” of working avant-gardists in the 1960s and beyond. 

Faculty
As you know, the tools of the compositional trade continue to evolve: recordings and scores thrive more online than in hard copy.  So the older copying and mailing costs dwindle, though compositional software and studio recording costs continue, as do production costs for CDs—our “audio brochures”—that feature our faculty’s music.  This year we funded studio work for Steven Ricks and also sessions for a new compilation of Christian Asplund’s complete organ music (performed by Thornock).  We expect actual products in hand in the coming year.
 
Meanwhile, we were able to provide Ricks, Asplund, and Thornock with travel support for premieres.  On a larger scale, for the second of three years ongoing, we combined our funds with other sources to send Steve Lindeman to the BMI Jazz Composers Workshop for advanced training and work shopping of his jazz compositions (examples of which one can hear on the latest CD by our faculty jazz quartet, Q’d Up 3 [Tantara 77941]).  Partly as a result of his BMI work, he says, Lindeman won a large ensemble commission for the Utah Arts Festival in summer 2009 and has been invited to the American Composers Orchestra / Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University’s Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute in summer 2010.

Even amid recessionary times, it has been a rich year for the Barlow Education Grant.  Already 2010 looks as promising, if not more so.  Stay tuned.

intern report

David Batchelor
MA Music Composition

David BatchelorI thank the Barlow Endowment for the impressive item on my résumé.  Because of the opportunity it has provided, I have associated with some of the greats in the world of composition.

In my second time through as an intern for the competition, I had the great pleasure of mingling with composers and musicians I greatly admire. Outside of the judging rooms, I got familiar with their personalities as I sat with them for lunch and dinner. I made contacts that will enhance and strengthen my network of associates for the rest of my career. This is not to mention the strengthened friendships I now have with the other interns involved.

Inside the judging rooms, I learned much of what it takes to win a composition competition. Presentation of scores and materials, quality of recordings, and the caliber of musicality in the compositions themselves were paramount in the selection process. Reputation had no apparent impact on the decisions made by the judges as to whether or not the composer deserved the prize or the commission. In addition to these lessons learned, I was encouraged by the impartiality displayed in the judging rooms. I am committed to entering the competition myself as often as it will be possible in my future career.

The experience on the whole was extremely motivating. I believe the purpose for the internship was absolutely accomplished. The interns have all expressed some degree of an increase in the confidence the have that their music can succeed in competitions like this one. If I were not so anxious to begin entering the competition myself, I would likely make an attempt to serve as an intern for a third time.

All my thanks to the Barlow Endowment and those associated with. The experience was richly rewarding.

Eric Callison
BM Music Composition

Eric CallisonApproaching the Barlow from the standpoint of two years of participation as an intern, I can honestly say the Barlow Endowment is a wonderful opportunity for composers around the world, but especially for LDS composers.

The prize judging this year was rather different from last year; far more people have written for string quartet than for solo trombone, so there were fewer submissions and some of them were very unusual.  In any case, the cream rose to the top, and some very good music was brought to the judging room.  During the final judging part of the discussion focused on easily-digestible music versus adventuresome and exploratory music.  While judges expressed sharply conflicting opinions on the matter, I was impressed that the subject was always treated respectfully, both during the judging and afterwards, and that the winner of the prize, Benjamin Ellin, was chosen as someone who could unite the two disparate artistic camps.  I am grateful that the Barlow Endowment exists to make new music of this caliber possible, and I look forward to hearing Joseph Alessi and the BYU Philharmonic’s excellent performance of it.

I was interested that this year, as last year, several composers of the sort who make it into music history textbooks did not advance to the final round of judging for General Commissions, and some well-known composers who did make it to the final round were not commissioned.  This showed me that the judges were willing to consider factors other than popularity or reputation in their judging, and that the music they chose was really the best music brought to the judging room.

I am glad to know that there are funds available specifically for the commissioning of LDS composers, whose contributions to the canon new music have in my estimation not been proportional to the ability and talent within the Church.  I was dismayed to see that only a very few LDS composers even submitted to the competition.  I feel that the Church has yet to come into its own as a contributor to the arts in general, and that the Barlow Endowment as a resource for the advancement of LDS composition has up to now been extremely underutilized.  I plan on submitting to the Barlow Competition in the future in the hope that, even though music will not be my primary profession, I can still create works of beauty that will represent the Church and uplift those around me.

Joseph Sowa
BM Music Composition ('10)

Joseph SowaEarly this June, I began my work for the Barlow Endowment by being introduced to “the cage.” In a caged off portion of a basement workroom sat all the submissions for this year’s Barlow competitions. It was our job as interns to sort and record all the submissions preparatory to the judging in August. So there we sat, over the course of several weeks, labeling, filing, and recording submission data deep underground. It all felt so disconnected from music and artistry, let alone the outside world and the beautiful summer weather.

Two months later, I got to see the rewards of all our preparations. The three days of judging more than made up for the previous drudgery. The mix of judges was electrifying. They were all as passionate about new music as they were diverse in their tastes and backgrounds. Initially, the best part of judging was that, although it was indoors, for this part of my internship, I could actually see the sunlight.

I quickly learned that it got better than feeling connected to the outside world. I got to help judges Ethan Wickman and John Costa. Watching them judge opened my eyes to how unique great art actually is. As a composer, I would have suspected that it would have taken a long time for them to go through the 50 prize entries we had in our judging room. However, as good as many of the entries were, there was a clear difference between most of the entries, which were competent, and the exceptional ones, which, in addition to being competent, were compelling. It was interesting to see that even though Wickman and Costa had different aesthetic sensibilities they both agreed on what was great and what was average. This experience showed me that it isn’t enough to write technically sound music. For music to stand out, it needs to make a distinct artistic statement, and if it does this, it will often transcend the listeners’ aesthetic preferences. The experience I had working with Wickman and Costa was mirrored in the other judging session in which I participated.

Not only did I learn much from the judges’ evaluation of the music, but I was also impressed by the perspective in which they placed the endeavor. It was clear that every participant in the Barlow Endowment was dedicated to the cause of advancing new music. However, in conversations I had while eating meals and during breaks, the  theme that kept coming from the judges—and I can’t think of a judge with whom I did not have some variation of this conversation—was the value of human relationships over music. For such highly successful composers as David Rakowski and Daniel Gawthrop to give their work a backseat to the friendships and family relationships in their lives reinforced to me the message that although what we do as composers has the power to change people, it is ultimately the people that matter, not what we do.

Sitting in dark basement at the beginning of the summer, I could have never suspected that the internship would have taught me so much both about composition and about life.


Personnel

Board of Advisors

Daniel GawthropRecent commissions for Daniel E. Gawthrop have included choral works for The Furman Singers of Furman University and for the Riverwood Singers of Riverwood International Charter School in Atlanta, Georgia. Both of these works will receive their world premiere performances at the 2010 Southeastern Division Convention of the American Choral Directors Association in Memphis, Tennessee. Concert Organist Dr. Joby Bell will give the world premiere performance of Gawthrop's Three Floral Preludes for organ in January 2010 at Presbyterian College in Clinton, SC.

Upcoming projects include recording sessions in February for a complete CD devoted to Gawthrop's choral music. A release date in mid 2010 is planned.

Steven RicksIn February 2009, Steven Ricks piece Amygdala received its New York premiere, performed by Jean Kopperud and Stephen Gosling. In addition, Amygdala was recorded with producer Judith Sherman. The song will appear on a forthcoming double-CD release by Jean Kopperud on Albany Records called Xtreme Measures. The world premiere for this piece took place at the TRANSIT New Music Festival in Leuven, Belgium in October 2008. 

Flexible Music recently recorded Steven’s piece Extended Play with Judith Sherman as well and it will appear on his next CD release alongside Waves/Particles (recorded by Morris Rosenzweig and Canyonlands) and Anthology (recorded by the Portland, Oregon-based group fEAR no MUSIC).  The world premiere of Force of the Mind was performed by trombonists William Mathis (BGSU) and Will Kimball (BYU) at the Bowling Green State University/MACCM New Music Festival, and included live electronics and a sculpture by artist Brian Christensen.  They performed the piece again at the US Army Band's Eastern Trombone Workshop in March 2010.  

Steven’s current projects include an electronic/improvisational work for the Karnatic Lab concert series in Amsterdam, scheduled for May 2010, and a new orchestra piece for the BYU Philharmonic Orchestra. 

David RakowskiIn May 2009, David Rakowski was awarded the Jeanette Lerman-Neubauer '69 Prize for Excellence in Teaching and Mentoring by Brandeis University. He also recently had two CDs released. The first title Winged Contraption was recorded with Boston Modern Orchestra Project and Marilyn Nonken, piano soloist and was released on the BMOP Sound label. The CD includes David’s piano concerto Persistent Memory, a Pulitzer finalist in 1999. The second CD titled Etudes Volume 3 was released on the sound label Bridge Records 9310. The recording, performed by pianist Amy Briggs, includes 24 piano etudes—78 1/2 minutes of music—from Books V, VI, and VII of David’s etudes.

Several of David’s compositions have been premiered this year. In March, Phillis Levin Songs, written for voice and Pierrot Ensemble, was premiered by Collage New Music and soprano Judith Bettina in Boston, Massachusetts. Stolen Moments, written for woodwind quintet, string quartet and piano, was premiered in May at the Merkin Concert Hall in New York City. The piece was commissioned by Merkin Concert Hall with a grant from the NEA and was premiered as part of “Writing Jazz: An Epilogue on Influence.” Two Flutudes were premiered by Mary Fukushima in Overland Park, Kansas, in October, and Mikronomicon, a mini-concerto for piano and Pierrot ensemble with percussion, was commissioned and premiered by Boston Musica Viva in November. In addition, David gave the keynote speech at the Festival of New American Music at Sacramento State University in November.

 

 

Ethan WickmanWith works hailed as "clever, elegantly crafted and deliriously charming" (Steve Smith, Night After Night) and possessed of "a flair for colorful orchestration" (San Francisco Classical Voice), composer Ethan Wickman has received grants and commissions from the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition, Meet the Composer, the American Composers Forum, the Wisconsin Music Teachers Association, Fulbright (for study in Madrid, Spain), the Norfolk Contemporary Music Workshop/Yale Summer School of Music, the Wellesley Composers Conference, the Utah Arts Council, and the Aspen Music Festival where his orchestral work Night Prayers Ascending won the Jacob Druckman Prize. 

Recent projects have included new pieces for Flexible Music, Zeitgeist, Piotr Szewczyk’s Violin Futuraseries, the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Wind Symphony, the Avalon String Quartet, and a forthcoming work for guitarist Daniel Lippel. 

Two new works, Namasté for string quartet and Angles of Repose for chamber ensemble, have recently been recorded by the Avalon String Quartet and the Zeitgeist Chamber Ensemble respectively, for commercial release on the Albany Records and Innova labels.

 

Guest Judges

Joseph Alessi

 

Joseph Alessi
Juilliard School of Music
Nyack, New York




John Costa

 

John Costa
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah

 


Kory Katseanes


Kory Katseanes
Brigham Young University
Provo, Utah




Will Kimball

 

Will Kimball
Brigham Young University
Provo, Utah

 


Neil Thornock

 

Neil Thornock
Brigham Young University
Provo, Utah

Back to Top 

2008 Barlow Winners

Barlow Prize Winner

After reviewing 336 composer applications from 27 countries worldwide, the judging panel awarded HAROLD MELTZER of New York City the $12,000 Barlow Price to compose a major new work for string quartet. The judging panel also work for string quartet. The judging panel also granted Kelly-Marie Murphy of Ottawa the distinction of Honorable Mention in this competition.

General Commission Recipients

Claude Baker
Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra with mark-Andre Hamlin, Pianist

Alvin Singleton
Orchestra of the League of Composers

Michael Gandolfi
Boston Musica Viva
Scott Wheeler
Joshua Gordon, Cellist
Steve Mackey
eighth blackbird
Seung-Ah Oh
Flexible Music
Christopher Rouse
Calder Quartet

Dr. Meltzer completed undergraduate work at Amherst College and received graduate degrees from Columbia, King's College and Yale University.

He cofounded the new music/theatre ensemble, Sequitur, and has been artistic director since 2004. He currently holds a teaching position at Vassar College.

LDS Commission Recipients
Daniel Bradshaw
ignace Jang, Violinist
Christian Asplund
Gamelan Bintang Wahyu
Christian Gentry
Benjamin Sung with Jihye Chang
Neil Thornock
Kenneth Long, Bass Clarinetist

The judging panel included the Endowment's Board of Advisors: Lansing McCloskey, Daniel Gawthrop, Steven Ricks and David Rakowski. David Dzubay and john Costa served as guest judges in the deliberations. Judith Eissenberg, Blaise Magnierre and Julie Bevan represented the Lydian, Avalon and Pacifica string quartets. These three ensembles comprise the Endowment's performing consortium who will premiere the new work in 2010.

The Endowment wishes to thank all composers and ensembles who applied for commissions. Because of limited resources, the Endowment regrets that many deserving composers and their projects went unfunded this year. In 2009, the Barlow Prize will feature a trombone concerto in celebration of the Endowment's 25th anniversary. Posters with details were sent out after the first of the year.

 

News

Barlow Education Grant brings renowned performers to BYU

Jean Kopperud and Stephen GoslingClarinetist Jean Kopperud and pianist Stephen Gosling visited BYU campus on November 11 and 12, 2008 through funds provided by the Barlow Education Grant.  During their visit, the duo read, rehearsed and recorded seven pieces composed by BYU students. 

They also presented an evening concert, performing a piece by Barlow Board Member and past Commission recipient, Steven Ricks

The following day, Kopperud conducted a master class for clarinet students.

Album receives featured review in Gramophone magazine

Lansing McLoskeyLansing McLoskey's album Sixth Species, which contains a Barlow Commissioned piece, was reviewed in the Gramophone Awards 2008 edition of Gramophone Magazine.

According to the review, the CD contains, "Smart, compelling music that gives strong hints of a punk-band past."

The reviewer concludes by saying, "All of the music is given first-class advocacy by the various ensembles, and "Sixth Species" offers a bracing sampler from an engaging, greatly gifted composer I hope to hear more from."

Premieres and Performances

David SanfordDavid Sanford's commissioned piece, Humilitatem, premiered on November 11, 2008 at St. Mary's School in Raleigh, North Carolina.

 


Malcolm ForsythMalcolm Forsyth’s
piece, Lyric Essay premiered at the International Double Reed Society Convention. The convention was held at Brigham Young University on July 22-26,2008.

Robert BeaserRobert Beaser’s new commissioned work premiered on June 15, 2008. The piece, which was written for the Boston Youth Symphony, will be featured as part of their final concert for the 2007-08 season. The performance will be held in the Sanders Theatre at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Gabriela Lena Gabriela Lena FrankFrank’s Barlow Commission premiered on May 30, 2008 at the internationally-acclaimed deYoung Museum in San Francisco, California by the Adorno Ensemble and soloist Lucy Shelton.

Prior to the premiere, Stanford University will hold a week-long residency, discussing the poetry of Pablo Neruda, which was used as the text for the music. John Felstiner, a leading scholar and translator of Neruda, will present a pre-concert lecture. Frank, Shelton, and the Adorno Ensemble will also lecture at Stanford.

Peter GilbertPeter Gilbert’s latest work, Hear as the Night Hollows, was premiered on April 2, 2008 at the Fenway Center at Northeastern University in Boston. The piece was again presented on May 14 and 15 as part of “The Sound Space Experience,” a concert sponsored through the Harvard University Studio for Electroacoustic Music.

Harold MeltzerHarold Meltzer’s Brion premiered January 29, 2007 at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. The piece was performed by the Cygnus Ensemble. On April 23, 2008, the Cygnus Ensemble again performed Brion at Merkin Hall in New York City as well as February 26, 2010 at Bargemusic in Brooklyn, New York. The program premiered by Mario Davidovsky, Charles Wuorinen, Mohammed Fairouz, and others.

Ethan WickmanEthan Wickman’s latest Barlow Commission, which was written for the Avalon String Quartet, premiered on April 17, 2008 at Northern Illinois University. It was also performed on April 20 at the Chicago Symphony Center’s Buntrock Hall. A commercial recording of the piece by the Avalon String Quartet is forthcoming.

Bruce Polay

Bruce Polay’s Polay String Quartet premiered on March 20, 2008 at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Florida. The piece, which was written for the Lynn University String Quartet, was presented as part of the university’s New Music Festival. The entire concert spotlighted the works of Bruce Polay.

 

Steven RicksSteven Ricks’ work Anthology premiered on March 7, 2008 as part of fEARnoMUSIC’s Metal and Wood meet Earth and Water concert series. The piece was first performed at The Old Church in Portland, Oregon and then again on March 21, 2008 at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

Also in 2008, Bridge Records released Mild Violence, an album showcasing Ricks’ works from the last eight years.

Peter McMurrayPeter McMurray’s Divje Babe premiered on March 12, 2008 at the Slosberg Hall at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. The piece was written for the Willow Flute Ensemble.

 

David RakowskiDavid Rakowski’s Cantina premiered in 2008. It was be performed March 2, 2008 by the Marine Band as part of the College Band Directors National Association (CBDNA) Conference in Washington, DC. Cantina was also presented on April 25, 2008 by the Meadow Winds Ensemble at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas.

Ross BauerRoss Bauer’s piece, Implicit Memory was completed near the end of 2007 and premiered on February 25, 2008. The piece, which lasts approximately thirteen minutes, was written for the New York New Music Ensemble. It was performed at the Merkin Hall in New York City.

Libby LarsenLibby Larsen’s latest piece Bach 358 premiered on February 23, 2008 as part of the College Orchestra Directors Association Annual Meeting. The piece was performed by the BYU Philharmonic Orchestra in the de Jong Concert Hall, and was well received.

Philippe BodinOn February 1, 2008 Albany Records released Elements, a compilation of piano music performed by Genevieve Feiwen Lee. The CD features Philippe Bodin’s 2004 Barlow Commission Inner Banners, which is a five-movement piece representing earth, fire, water, air and metal.

Steven HartkeStephen Hartke’s work Meanwhile premiered on November 7, 2007 at the University of Richmond School of Music as part of an entire evening of Hartke’s compositions. The piece, which was written for Eighth Blackbird, was performed several other time during the 2007-2009 seasons and was one of three finalists for the 2008 Pulitzer Prize.

For a review of the premiere and an interview with Hartke, please click here. You can also visit eighth blackbird's website if you click here.

 


Reports

EXecutive director Report
Tom Durham
Executive Director
Barlow Endowment for Music Composition

In 1983, Milton Barlow asked my predecessor Merrill Bradshaw to sit down with Newell Dayley and James Mason and hammer out the particulars of the Barlow Endowment’s charter. After multiple consultations with our founder, Milton Barlow and others familiar with the process of drafting such documents, the three of them laid the foundation of what was to become one of the world’s leading commissioning agencies for composers of art music. Bradshaw, Dayley, and Mason became the first Board of Directors, and the Barlow Endowment was off and running. By 1985, the organization deployed the charter, awarding commissions to composers in addition to supporting the composition faculty and students at Brigham Young University—the Endowment’s permanent home.

If you look at the Endowment’s newly-constructed website, you will notice the broad range of composers, soloists, ensembles and venues with whom we have associated over the past 25 years. Our record demonstrates
a strong and reliable commitment to composers
and new music. Over the years, many composers and musicians (too many to list) have donated their time and energy to this cause. I thank all of the past winners, applicants, advisors, directors, and staff who have helped build our worldwide reputation. Even in difficult economic times, the Endowment holds fast to its ideals--encouraging and financially supporting individuals who demonstrate technical skills and natural gifts for the composition of great music.

Education Grant Report
Michael Hicks
Professor of Music, Division Coordinator - Composition / Music Theory
School of Music, BYU

Student Support
We used slightly less than a third of this year’s budget on scholarships, Barlow meeting internships, student-performer fees (for composition classes), and travel support for student composers to hear their works performed or to attend workshops. One instance of the latter—local, but of special note—was the Salt Lake City workshop,
rehearsal, and concert of Harry Partch’s music and instruments, which a large group of our students attended and found particularly inspiring, even revelatory. We find that student hunger for unusual—and particularly microtonal—music is growing as mass media continue to saturate the airwaves with increasingly uninteresting acoustic formulae.

Faculty Support
Aside from miscellaneous recording costs (for projects such as Ricks’ recent work Waves/Particles), the project of special note this year was Christian Asplund’s new CD Viola, a copy of which we have provided to each board member. I personally find this a masterwork of creative music—fresh in sound and technique, introspective and haunting in its expression. In connection with this release, we funded travel for Asplund to promote this new work in the Northwest. We also funded a bit of other travel, including Neil Thornock’s trip to South Carolina for a premiere at the North American Saxophone Alliance.

Aside from the usual smaller amounts of spending for producing, copying, and mailing scores, we purchased small digital recorders for each of our composition faculty for on-site recording of their performances (and students’ performances), improvisations, or other sound sources for composition. We also made some small upgrades to computer-based notational or electroacoustic programs in our composers’ offices.

Guests and Residencies
Our featured guests this year included virtuoso performers who not only gave stellar recitals but rehearsed, played, and recorded student works: the chamber group fEARnoMUSIC in March and the piano and clarinet duo Jean Kopperud and Stephen Gosling in November. As usual, these guests gave our students important insights into performance idioms as well as extremely serviceable digital records of those students’ latest music.

We had some brief visits from Barlow commissionees David Crumb and Harold Meltzer (Pulitzer finalist in 2009). We also had two composers for slightly longer visits, both of whom keep being quoted and cited by our students (always a good sign): Orlando Jacinto Garcia and Jarrad Powell. Both of these amazingly broadminded and eclectic composer/thinker/teachers deepened our student’s minds with some outwardly simple but dramatically beautiful music and ideas.

Our sincerest thanks go to the Barlow Endowment for its continuing support, which slowly but palpably continues to strengthen the educational experience of BYU.

 

Intern Reports

David Batchelor
MA Music Composition


I felt like I was finally in the mix. Dan Gawthrop, Dave Rakowski and Lansing McLoskey were having a nice conversation over dinner and I was dining and chatting right there with them. We shared desserts. I had a chat with our dean, Dr. Jones, while two of the Barlow daughters, Alice and Nancy, were sitting there interested in what I had to say. I got to know Blaise Magniere, the violinist from the Avalon Quartet, who cautioned me to write extended techniques for his instrument only when an artistic musical objective would warrant it. I found myself mingling and associating my name with icons of the success I hoped to achieve one day.
What’s more, I was in the room when the judges made their judgments. I saw how carefully they considered some pieces and how quickly they rejected others. Sometimes, it was in a matter of seconds. Listening to the recording wasn’t even necessary for some submissions.

I can’t imagine that there could be another
opportunity like it for someone like me, to witness their decision-making, their reactions
to the good and their winces at the bad. I know what type of music wins competitions like this, and I didn’t before. You might think I was intimidated, whether that intimidation came by way of noticing the great complexity of some of the works submitted, or by the solid competency seen in the judges, but you would be mistaken.

I was encouraged and inspired. I was treated with respect. I was motivated when I realized that they considered me their colleague.
When I start a new composition, or when I am stumped on a measure and need an idea, I still draw from that experience. New ideas, and better ideas, find their place in my music.
In conclusion, I am happy to report that it didn’t end with the three days at Snowbird. I still communicate with some of the judges. I recently sent a draft of a score to Dan Gawthrop and he responded with comments and helpful information on how to get it performed. All things considered, the internship was invaluable to me. I will be back in 2009 for another round.

Eric Callison
BA Music Composition


I am grateful for my involvement in the 2008 Barlow Prize Competition for many reasons; prominent among them is the perspective it offered me on the world of music composition in general. It has long been my understanding that art of any kind becomes richer, fuller, and more successful as the artist gains experience and expands his or her horizons. This is why I consider the Barlow to be a very valuable experience for me, and that it would be a valuable experience for any student composer.
During the filing process I was interested in the number of composers who submitted works from all over the world. With nothing more than a cursory glance at each submission, I could tell that the contest entrants had vastly differing degrees of experience, and that some submissions would fare much better than others. Going over hundreds of submissions etched firmly into my mind that I should take great care when submitting anything to any contest, so that my hard work can be more easily appreciated.

Meeting the judges was also a very eye-opening experience for me, as I have had little opportunity thus far to meet with either composers or performers that subsist solely from their art. It also gave me the opportunity,
which I probably would not have been able to have otherwise, of talking to heads of composition departments, world-class performers, and the dean of the College of Fine Arts one-on-one and being able to ask honest questions and receive honest answers. It was a reassuring experience to be able to speak to these important, once-seemingly unapproachable people, and find that they were supportive of us young, budding composers.

The judges were without exception pleasant to work with and excellent at their jobs. The judging process was both breathtakingly fast and sufficiently thorough. Watching the judging was highly instructive. I could easily see the difference between something looking cool on paper, or seeming intelligent in theory, and sounding convincing in performance. The judges’ vast experience sometimes gave them a more integral concept than I had of what was truly original and well-wrought. By listening to their responses to all of the contest submissions, I was able to examine my own oeuvre, looking for patterns and weak areas. Listening to the judging process at once filled my head with ideas for new compositions and gave me new criteria for the evaluation and application of these ideas.

I consider myself very much enriched
by my experience with the 2008 Barlow Competition. I encourage all who are offered this opportunity to jump at the chance and take advantage of the association with vast amounts of music, great judges (excellent food), and the inner workings of a prestigious worldwide competition to enrich themselves and their art.

Kathryn Duque
BA Music Composition (’09)


The first morning of Barlow judging, I hovered over the two judges whose room I had been assigned to, handing them new scores every few minutes, switching CDs and CD tracks, and setting out the composers’ resumes, just in case the judges were interested. The judges sat at a table, flipping through scores, sometimes rejecting an entry before I had even had time to turn on the accompanying CD. Every now and then, they found something that made them want to hear more, and we would spend a few more minutes skipping through the CD, listening to parts of pieces, before the judges decided to send the entry to the “maybe” or the “yes” pile. The “no” pile grew rapidly, the “yes” pile much more slowly.

We spent the whole first day this way, stopping only for meals, but the day went by very quickly for me. While I quietly kept all the entries organized, I also got to eavesdrop on my judges. One judge was a composer and the other was a performer, so I got two different viewpoints on many entries. The two views often coincided, but together they brought a wider range of considerations for judging than either would have had alone. I learned as much, if not more, from the comments the judges made about the entries they didn’t like as I did from the comments about the entries that got to move on to the final judging round.

The next two days I watched as all the judges got together to pick the final prize winner, and then the winners for General and LDS Commissions. The other interns and I turned on CDs and passed out scores, but mostly we just soaked up all the ideas, complaints, and concerns that the judges were bouncing off of each other. I was always amazed at how quickly the judges were able to make intelligent, informed decisions. I felt that the judges accomplished so much in three short days.

Likewise, in that time, I also learned so much. In the exciting, fast-paced judging atmosphere, I learned to think about many aspects of composing that I hadn’t considered before. By spending time with professional composers and performers, as well as being exposed to all the new music from the submissions to the competition, I felt motivated to continue with my own compositions. Interning for the Barlow Competition has been an enriching and inspiring experience for me, and I am grateful that I had the chance to participate.

Brooke Snow
MA Music Composition (’08)


It was a great privilege and honor to be associated with the Barlow Endowment for Composition this summer. I give great credit and appreciation to the Barlow family for their foresight and support of the arts and particularly the commissions of new works of music by great composers. What a wonderful
opportunity for so many musicians, performers,
and composers, to have this type of support!
My work as an intern for the Barlow Endowment began a few months before the Snowbird retreat. As interns we gathered together and cataloged every entry as it arrived in preparation for the August festivities. What I expected to be a rather tedious, time consuming, boring task, was really one of the most enlightening! I learned so much about how to prepare something for a competition. As I worked alongside the judges months later, I was reminded of those same impressions, makingseveral mental notes on how to present my work--especially given the short amount of time each entry has. I was pleased to see that the music was given the most attention. Because the music is the main influence
upon decisions, it is also imperative that the recording be of the highest quality possible. There were plenty of scores that I am sure would have been more enlightening if it were not for the MIDI attempting to portray what only the human touch possibly can.

I was very impressed with the panel of judges and the honest and equal chance they gave each entry. Despite the varying aesthetics and experience of judges paired together, and even my own personal values and aesthetics for music, it was quite interesting to see how often it was with unanimously consent that pieces were selected as finalists for consideration. I believe this speaks highly of the composers to be able to communicate musically on many different levels.

Another great privilege of this experience was the opportunity to mingle with the judges. With meals and meetings there were plenty of opportunities to learn from these highly qualified musicians. I found each one to be openly willing to help us as students, and even more so as composers who were someday hoping to break into the professional world. Many judges would not even wait to be approached, but took an interest in us, and openly stated things that they look for and what they hoped we would be learning from the experience as well.

Overall, the experience of listening to so much music was also enlightening. It was good to hear what is currently being composed and use it as a measuringstick for my own work and direction in composition. I learned the importance of networking. Not only establishing good relationships with other composers;
but performers, conductors, and educators.

 

Personnel

Board of Advisors
Lansing McLoskeyDescribed as “a major talent and a deep thinker with a great ear” by the American Composers Orchestra, Lansing McLoskey’s music has been performed across the U.S. and in eleven other countries. He has received commissions and grants from the NEA, Meet The Composer, Fromm Foundation, ASCAP, Barlow Endowment, Music At The Anthology, King’s Chapel, Mormon Artists Group, Harvard University, and the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. He has written for such renowned ensembles as The Hilliard Ensemble, Speculum Musicae, and the New Millennium Ensemble.

Recent premieres include The Madding Crowd at the 2007 Tanglewood Music Festival by Triton Brass, and two orchestral works - SLAM! and Chanson pour cordes - by the Frost Symphony Orchestra at Festival Miami 2007. He also received the Orovitz Award from the University of Miami, where he is an Assisstant Professor.

Current projects include new works for The Ibis Camerata and Dinosaur Annex Ensemble in Boston. Recordings of his music are released on Albany, Wergo Schallplatten, Capstone, and Tantara Records. In 2008, Albany Records released an entire CD devoted to McLoskey’s work. The album, Glisten and Wild Bells includes both of his Barlow commissioned works.

Dan GawthropRecent commissions for Dan Gawthrop include anthems for churches in Bridgewater, Virginia and Atlanta, Georgia, as well as a liturgical mass setting for chorus, brass, organ
and congregation for an Episcopal parish in Durham, North Carolina. East Texas Baptist University commissioned and premiered an a cappella choral work called Prayer for Grace in honor of faculty member Jim Moore. A commission from the St. Louis Children’s Choir led to the first premiere of a Gawthrop work in Powell Symphony Hall. A choral festival devoted entirely to Gawthrop works included a brief residency by the composer with the Choral Society of Central Georgia in Macon. Concert organist Rudy Lucente gave the first performance of a Gawthrop work in Verizon Hall in Philadelphia on the large instrument by Dobson Organ Builders.

Steven RicksSteven Ricks’ debut solo CD, Mild Violence, was released by Bridge Records in May 2008. It includes three Barlow-commissioned pieces: Boundless Light for flute and electronics; American Dreamscape for chamber ensemble and electronics; and Dividing Time for percussion quartet. The CD has received several favorable reviews, including a five-star (highest) review in the September 2008 issue of BBC Music Magazine.

Additional premieres and performances in 2008 included: Waves/Particles for flute, cello, percussion, and electronics, commissioned by the Canyonlands New Music Ensemble and premiered by them on April 23 in Salt Lake City; Amygdala, commissioned by the Utah Arts

 

Council for clarinetist Jean Kopperud, and premiered by the Kopperud/Gosling duo at the TRANSIT New Music Festival, October 26 in Leuven, Belgium, and including several other performances in the US; and Young American Inventions for piano and electronics, performed by pianist Vicki Ray, December 10 at REDCAT in Los Angeles.

David Rakowski’s David RakowskiBarlow Prize commission
Cantina was premiered by the US Marine Band at Northern Virginia Community College on March, 2007, with performances by the University of Michigan Symphony Band on November 21 and the Meadows Wind Ensemble of SMU on February 20, 2008. His 35-minute Piano Concerto, written for Marilyn Nonken and Boston Modern Orchestra Project and commissioned by the Koussevitzky Foundation, was premiered in Jordan Hall, Boston, and recorded for CD release on the BMOP Sound label; in January his Sex Songs was premiered by Susan Narucki and Network for New Music as part of the Leonard Bernstein Festival sponsored by the Philadelphia Orchestra. Cantina and an eighth volume of piano études were published by CF Peters.

In June, Etudes Volume 3 was recorded in New York by pianist Amy Briggs for upcoming release on Bridge Records. Rakowski spent six weeks at the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Umbria, Italy, in June and July working on a commission from the Kaufman Center in New York City.

Guest Judges

Julie Bevan
Julie Bevan
Brigham Young University
Provo, UT
John Costa
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, UT
John Costa
David Dzubay
David Dzubay
Indiana University
Bloomington, IN
Judith Eissenberg
Lydian Quartet
Waltham, MA
Judith Eissenberg
Blaise Magniere
Blaise Magniere
Avalon Quartet
Oak Park, IL

2007 BARLOW Winners

Barlow Prize Winner

Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez

Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez

The Barlow Endowment for Music Composition at Brigham Young University takes pleasure in announcing the commission winners for 2007. After reviewing 327 composer applications, from nearly two dozen countries worldwide, the judging panel awarded CARLOS SANCHEZ-GUTIERREZ the $10,000 Barlow Prize to compose a new work for percussion ensemble.

General Commission Recipients

Robert Beaser
Boston Youth Symphony

Peter Gilber
Michael Norsworthy and Clarinet

Eric Moe
Boston Modern Orchestra Project
Lawrence Moss
Left Bank Concert Society
David sanford
Duo D'amore
Chrisopher Tignor
Brooklyn Rider String Quartet

Born in Mexico City in 1964, Professor Sanchez-Gutierrez studied composition with Henri Dutilleux, Jacob Druckman and Martin Bresnick. He serves as Composer-in-Residence at the Morelia International New Music Festival in addition to similar duties with the Binghamton Philharmonic. Past awards include prizes from the Koussevitzky, Guggenheim Fromm and Rockefeller Foundations. In 2000, Publicco, a Mexican daily newspaper, named Sanchez-Gutierrez “Person of the Year.”

LDS Commission Recipients

Matthew Barnson
Sospiro Winds

Peter McMurray
Willow Ensemble
Bruce Polay
Lynn University Conservatory String Quartet
Ethan Wickman
Avalon String Quartet

Sanchez-Gutierrez’s compositions receive frequent performances in the United States, Latin America, Europe, and Asia. He holds an Associate Professorship in Composition at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.

The judging panel included the Endowment’s Board of Advisors (Melinda Wagner, Claude Baker, Lansing McLoskey, Daniel Gawthrop and Steven Rick) as well as representatives from the ensembles which will premiere Sanchez-Gutierrez’s new work during 2009: Ray Dillard of Nexus, Anders Loguin of Kroumata and Adam Sliwinski of So Percussion. John Costa of the University of Utah also served as a guest judge.

The Barlow Endowment also received 135 applications for the General and LDS Commissions. The Endowment granted $76,000 to twelve composers who will write commissioned works.

 

 

Premieres and Performances

Daniel KelloggDaniel Kellogg’s new work for bassoon and string quartet premiered December 4, 2007 at the University of Colorado. University of Colorado faculty member Yoshiyuki Ishikawa and the University of Colorado Faculty Quartet performed the piece.

David VayoDavid Vayo’s 1997 Barlow Commission was performed in 2007. The piece, Awakening of the Heart, was presented on November 30, 2007 in Hong Kong during the International Society for Contemporary Music’s World Music Days Festival. It was performed by the Sher Jie Ensemble of the Sichuan Conservatory of Music.

Steven HartkeStephen Hartke’s work, Meanwhile, premiered on November 7, 2007 at the University of Richmond School of Music. The piece was written for, and performed by, Eighth Blackbird. It piece was presented as part of an entire evening of Hartke’s compositions. Meanwhile was one of three finalists for the 2008 Pulitzer Prize.

Dan ViscontiDan Visconti’s work, Trying Conclusions, premiered on October 7, 2007, by the MooreBetter Duo at Kulas Hall on the Cleveland Institute of Music campus in Cleveland, Ohio.


Luca AntignaniLuca Antignani’s Il Viag­gio di Humbert, premiered in October 2007. It was performed on October 12 and 14 by the Network for New Music in Haverford, Pennsylvania; October 18 by the Indiana University New Music Ensemble in Bloomington, Indiana; October 25 and 29 by the Left Coast Music Ensemble in San Francisco, California; and October 28 by the Ensemble Formerly Known as X in Ithaca, New York.

Burton BeermanBurton Beerman’s JOLT/ A Still, Small Voice was commissioned in 2005 and performed multiple times in 2007. It was staged by the University of Iowa Dance Department on May 31 through June 2, and featured a live performance by cellist Amy Phelps. The piece was also taken on tour throughout Finland, Russia and New York City.

Jim HiscottJim Hiscott’s commissioned work, River of Light premiered on Saturday, May 12, 2007 in the Madsen Recital Hall at Brigham Young University during the University’s Deseret Chamber Music Festival. The piece was performed by the ensemble Orpheus Winds.

Aleksandra VrebalovAleksandra Vrebalov’s work, Stations, premiered by the Rhode Island Civic Chorale and Orchestra on March 31, 2007 at the Blessed Sacrament Church in Providence, Rhode Island. The soloists for the premiere were Jean Danton and Rene de la Garza.

 

Daniel BradshawDan Bradshaw’s piece, Delights and Shadows, premiered on March 24, 2007 at Brigham Young University Hawaii. It was performed by Metropolitan Opera star, Ariel Bybee; Chicago Symphony violinist, Alison Dalton; and BYU-Hawaii faculty member, Stacy McCarrey on the piano. Additional performances were held March 27, 2007 at the University of Hawaii and during fall 2007 at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln and the Chicago Cultural Center.

Todd ColemanTodd Coleman’s Flute Concerto premiered at Coleman’s alma mater, Brigham Young University, on March 23, 2007. It was performed by April Clayton in the de Jong Concert Hall in conjunction with the BYU Chamber Orchestra.

Kurt RohdeKurt Rohde’s work Seeing Things, written for violinist Axel Strauss, premiered on March 9 and 10, 2007. It was performed by the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra, featuring violinist Axel Strauss and violist Madeline Prager.

Stacey GarropStacey Garrop’s commissioned piece, Torque, premiered on March 5, 2007 in Chicago, Illinois by Viacheslav Dinerchtein and Mauricio Nadoer, with noted pianist Kuang Hao Huang.


George TsontakisGeorge Tsontakis’ Clair de Lune premiered on March 2 and 3, 2007 by the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra in St. Paul Minnesota. The performance was re-broadcasted via Minnesota Public Radio on April 16, 2007.

Ethan WickmanEthan Wickman’s newest work, Atomic Variations, premiered on February 10, 2007 by Flexible Music at the Construction Company Gallery in New York City. The piece was also performed in Utah during fall 2007.

Harold MeltzerHarold Meltzer’s Brion premiered January 29, 2007 at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. The piece was performed by the Cygnus Ensemble.



Chen YiChen Yi’s Tibetan Tunes premiered on January 27, 2007 by the New Pacific Trio at Faye Spanos Concert Hall at the University of Pacific in Stockton, California.

 


Judith BinghamJudith Bingham’s Ghost Towns of the American West debuted on January 1, 2007. Its first premiere was by the VocalEssence Ensemble Singers in Minneapolis. The University of Utah Singers premiered the piece on April 22, 2007 at Libby Gardner Hall in Salt Lake City, Utah. An additional premiere was done on September 1, 2007 by the BBC Singers in London.


Reports

EXecutive director Report
Tom Durham
Executive Director
Barlow Endowment for Music Composition

More than a decade ago, the Barlow Prize (then known as the Barlow International Composers Competition) featured a string quartet. The year was 1996 and a consortium of three ensembles including the Cassatt, Cuarteto Latino Americano and the Muir string quartets agreed to premiere a composition that had yet to be written by that year’s winner, Chris Theophanidis.
This arrangement between ascendant world class composers and prestigious ensembles continues to distinguish the Barlow Endowment from other commissioning agencies. As a result, the Endowment has produced much over the past quarter century. Dozens and dozens of new works written by emerging and established composers have been premiered by esteemed ensembles on many continents.

Over the years, new compositions for string quartets have flourished with the help of the Barlow Endowment. Commissions in 1989, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006 and 2007 have included works written for, among others, the Cassatt, Muir, Vermeer and Colorado Faculty quartets.
For 2008, the Barlow Prize returns to the venerable idea of a string quartet. Again, we have three tremendous ensembles joining our consortium: the Avalon, Lydian and Pacifica quartets. In August 2008, each ensemble will send a representative to the Snowbird Resort in the Wasatch Mountains high above Salt Lake City. There, along with members of the Barlow Endowment’s Board of Advisors, they will help judge the competition at our annual summer meetings.

We expect 300-400 composers from around the world to submit applications. Our poster containing details of this competition and all other commissioning programs was mailed out to all our friends and associates in January 2008.

Education Grant Report
Michael Hicks
Professor of Music, Division Coordinator - Composition / Music Theory
School of Music, BYU

It seems that we have found our “groove” -- at least for now. We tend to spend our funds in three categories (which you may find used as rubrics in future reports). Let me summarize them.

The first is student support. This includes (1) scholarships, (2) internships, and (3) performance fees. We contributed this year, as usual, a fixed amount to the general graduate scholarship fund of the School of Music (from which we then paid out much more to composition students). We also paid some supplementary scholarship money for students who needed just a little extra money to finish their graduate degrees during spring or summer term (for which we do not normally award scholarships).

The internship funds are monies paid to students who serve at the annual Barlow meetings. These, I should note, have been some of the most valuable educational experiences our composition students receive each year.

Finally, performance fees are the small amounts paid to student performers in composition classes. We have an advantage over many schools: we create standing ensembles, groups of players who read our young composers’ work, in composition classes. Invaluable.

The second spending area is faculty support. This includes money given to BYU composition faculty for manuscript copying or engraving, recording projects and travel to premieres or important performances. This year over one fourth of our total Education Grant expenditures went to two recording projects.

The first of these was sub venting the Bridge label recording called Mild Violence by Steven Ricks. This is a first-rate collection, beautifully representing the work of this composer and faculty member. Each of the Board Members will receive a complimentary copy, which will, in effect, speak for itself.

The other recording project takes a slightly different turn for us. Steve Lindeman, while a practicing theorist and jazz pianist, also composes creatively and thoughtfully in jazz idioms. This year we allocated him a good sum of money to realize new compositions with professional players in the studio. A seed is sown and we will see how the fruits develop in due course.

The third, and final, spending area is for guests and residencies. As in previous years, this category constitutes our largest expense -- about half of what we spent this year.

Many guests made brief visits: Judith Bingham and Luca Antignani -- both excellent, informative guests and past Barlow Prize winners; Carolyn Bremer, who gave students very practical (and humorous) advice on getting one’s work out to players and audiences; Augusta Read Thomas, a perennial favorite, with her always imaginative music and inspiring thoughts; and two LDS composers well known to the Endowment, Lansing McLoskey and Ethan Wickman, who presented very impressive samples of their recent work.

The largest expense in this category was for the fall 2007 residency of Flexible Music, an expert chamber ensemble that rehearsed and recorded student works, spoke in composition seminars and master classes and performed a nighttime concert that included works by Ricks and Wickman.

While the Barlow Endowment at large flourishes in its achievements and prestige, so its “auxiliary,” the Barlow Education Grant, has lifted – set on a hill, as it were – the aesthetic presence and compositional legacy of BYU’s composers.

 


Intern Reports

Kathryn Denos
BM Music Composition, BYU, 2002
MM Music Composition, BYU, Aug 2007


Working as an intern for the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition was an incredibly valuable experience for me, as a composition student. Not only was it an opportunity to work with some of today’s world renowned composers, but with world renowned performing groups as well.

Composition students initially concern themselves with the techniques and craftsmanship of writing, but often fail to address the specifics, how-to’s and processes for getting their works known and marketed. These important elements of composition, as well as many others, were brought to light as we worked with professionals, and got a look behind the scenes of the Barlow Endowment.

First, it is imperative that we as composers are aware of and enter various composition contests. These are necessary for one’s continuing individual portfolio, and are often asked for on contest applications.

Second, when writing for a specific contest, submit your best writing for the specified genre, because that is what the judges are looking for. During the Barlow adjudication, I saw many wonderful compositions and composers that did not get chosen simply because they did not submit works that exhibited enough use of percussion to warrant the prize commission, which was for a percussion ensemble.

Third, it is imperative that you know who will perform the commissioned work. This influences the styles and techniques composers incorporate in their composition, making it enticing to the performers. We repeatedly asked the questions:
• Do you think this composer could write well enough for this particular performing group?
• Would it be exciting enough to receive multiple performances?
• Is the score clean and professionally notated?
• Did they submit a CD with a good recording?
• Is it good writing?
When hundreds of applications and scores are evaluated, there must be something tremendously exciting about a work that makes it stand out. “Is it captivating from the very beginning?” Never underestimate the power of a great and memorable opening idea.

Reviewing the applications was also interesting. Each applicant submitted a bid representing the monetary compensation needed in order to write a commissioned work. Each applicant also included a proposed commission length and a commitment of performance for it from an ensemble or group. These items helped determine whether or not composers received commissions. After many long hours of deliberation between the judges and performing group representatives, the less impressive compositions were weeded out, and finalists were chosen. Input from each judge was respectfully noted as the scoring system began. Final decisions were diplomatically voted on and awarded to those compositions which obtained a majority vote. The process was truly its own work of art. The knowledge gained from this hands-on experience was not only indispensable, but truly educational and insightful.

Nicholas Greer
BM Music Composition, BYU, April 2005
MM Music Composition, BYU, Candidate


I was the only intern from last year who returned to the Barlow judging session this summer, and I have to say, my experience this year was even more poignant than last year. I had the opportunity to help Ray Dillard and Claude Baker as they made their way through submissions for the Barlow Prize. It was incredible to me that these men were able to decide on most submissions without having to hear the CD. I also remember they paid no particular deference to any one submission solely because of the composer’s name. I watched in amazement as submissions from the likes of Ligeti and Wolff were passed up in favor of other lesser-known composers. I observed the same principle again when I had the opportunity to work with Melinda Wagner and Lansing McLoskey during the General and LDS commissions.

The thing I remember most about the final judging session was the dynamic between the composers and the performers, as their sometimes competing interests clashed over who should win the Prize. While watching and listening to the group hammer-out decisions, I learned the importance of maintaining good relationships with performers. I quickly observed that without the performing ensembles’ input, the composers could very likely award a commission that would never be performed; and music without willing performers is just ink on paper.

One thing I remember happening this year that I don’t recall from the previous year was the sum-up session the interns had at the end. It was a wonderful way to share with each other all the nuggets of wisdom we had individually collected during the process. I left the Barlow judging with a renewed desire to write, courage to seek more commissions of my own, and above all, a deep feeling of gratitude for the enormous opportunity to witness and learn from this process. My thanks goes to the Barlow family and the Endowment Directors for making this possible. I hope the internship program continues to be useful to the Endowment in the future, because the little work we do is nothing compared to the lessons we take home with us.

Joshua K. Harris
BM Music, Appalachian state, 2003
MM Music Composition, BYU, Candidate


I am extremely thankful for the opportunity I had to intern with the Barlow Endowment. It was an honor and privilege to associate with all of the wonderful composers and performers. For me, it was a week of intense learning that was surprisingly enlightening.

I spent the first day working with Anders Loguin and Lansing McLoskey. My initial observation was that it is vastly easier to judge a piece to be uncompetitive than to select a finalist. The former task was quickly accomplished without even listening to a recording in many cases. Among the more than one hundred applications that were covered that first day, musically speaking, several gestural clichés rose to the surface again and again. Mediocre compositions blended together and I began to see what it meant for a piece to stand out.

The second day, the Board of Advisors and Guest Judges reviewed the Prize finalists. It was fascinating to watch the judges explain their various criteria and to see the consensus gradually form, defining and refining the group. A couple of themes emerged from those meetings. First, when commissioning a piece of music, the performers’ aesthetic is important. The composers on the Board and the Guest Judges had different, but equally valid, ideas about new music. I left the Barlow judging with a renewed desire to write, courage to seek more commissions of my own and above all, a deep feeling of gratitude for the enormous opportunity to witness and learn from this process. Second, pacing is crucial to make a piece stand out. The finalists were perfect in this regard. They all had something to say and said it effectively. I worked with Daniel Gawthrop and John Costa to judge LDS and General Commissions. The judges looked for the same elements: pacing, freshness and individual voice.

The entire process was efficient. Credit goes to the Board of Directors for their organization. The applicants were regarded with respect, even the applicants who had not followed the guidelines. Every effort was made to ensure fairness and professionalism. I hope that interns will continue to be utilized by the Barlow Endowment. Though the interns are used to make the process run smoothly, the true benefit is to the interns themselves as they observe the judging and meet great musicians. I enjoyed chatting with the judges and learning about career options and how to be more successful. My notes from the experience will be of great value to me for time to come.

David Snedegar
BM Music, California State, 2006
MM Music Composition, BYU, Candidate


As a music composition student, I have had many lessons, attended multiple seminars, written countless papers and completed several projects. I have attended concerts and I have participated in performances. I have learned much about music and, in particular, what defines a good piece of music. Through all my experiences and studies, there have been key moments and events which have had a substantial effect upon my compositional practices. My time as an intern for the Barlow Endowment was such an event.

First, it was a great privilege to associate with experienced, proficient composers and performers. I learned much from the different perspectives and musical tastes they presented. All gave the same advice to the young rising composer: get your music performed. And how do I get my music performed? Networking.

Watching the judging process itself was one of the greater learning experiences. Seeing them analyze scores, critically listen to music and then hearing their comments about each piece was priceless education. There were many times I wanted to ask questions about the music they were reviewing, and it was all I could do to sit and work quietly in the corner, preparing scores and playing CDs. I found myself making personal, silent judgments about each piece of music and I was happy that I was coming to the same conclusions that they were in many cases.

While observing the judging process, I had a disheartening realization as I pondered how my own musical works would stand up against the competition. I came to the conclusion that many of my pieces would not make it very far, which immediately affected the pieces I was working on. I now picture each of my pieces going through the same rigorous judging process, and this is helping my music (at least in my mind) rise above mediocrity. I also learned what to send, and what not to send, to similar competitions. Some applications where discarded even though they were well written because they did not relevant to the competition. The judges where pleased when an applicant had taken the time to mark in the score and make extra tracks of the music that the applicant wanted the judges to hear. Seeing the inside of such a contest will give me an advantage when submitting
work to various competitions.

There was a lot of work in the filing process and getting everything ready for judging, but it was well worth it. I feel I gained much more than I contributed. It was a pleasure to be a part of the wonderful Barlow Endowment for Music Composition. I can see it is a truly great gift for composers.


Personnel

Board of Advisors
Melinda WagnerPulitzer Prize winning composer Melinda Wagner, recently completed a piece for the US Marine Band, which premiered in April 2008.

Additionally, Wagner is currently working on several new projects, including a work for the Juilliard String Quartet and harp, a piano quintet for the Left Coast Ensemble, and a new work for Orpheus. All of these projects are set to premiere in 2009. Wagner recently heard the premiere performance of her Concerto for Trombone and Orchestra, composed for Joseph Alessi and the New York Philharmonic.


Claude BakerDuring the 2007 calendar year, Claude Baker was awarded the rank of Chancellor’s
Professor and was presented with the Tracy M. Sonneborn Award by Indiana University.
According to Indiana University, “These professorships and the Sonneborn Award are meant to bring significant recognition to those members of the Indiana University faculty who have achieved local, national and international distinction in both teaching and research/creative activity.”

Baker was also selected as a Composer-in-Residence for the 2008 Bowdoin International Summer Music Festival in Maine and as the 2008-09 Paul Fromm Composer-in-Residence at the American Academy in Rome. During 2007, his music was performed at the Trigonale Festival in Klagenfurt, Austria, the Ruhr Festival in Essen, the Schleswig-Holstein Festival, the Rheingau Music Festival and at the Brahms-Saal of the Stadthalle in Karlsruhe, Germany.


Lansing McLoskeyDescribed as “a major talent and a deep thinker with a great ear” by the American Composers Orchestra, Lansing McLoskey’s compositions have been performed across the U.S. and in eleven other countries. He has received commissions and grants from the NEA, Meet the Composer, the Fromm Foundation, ASCAP,
the Barlow Endowment, Music at the Anthology, King’s Chapel, Mormon Artists Group, Harvard University and the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. McLoskey has written for such renowned ensembles as The Hilliard Ensemble, Speculum Musicae and the New Millennium Ensemble.

Recent premieres include The Madding Crowd at the 2007 Tanglewood Music Festival by Triton Brass, and two orchestral works -- SLAM! and Chanson Pour Cordes -- by the Frost Symphony Orchestra at Festival Miami 2007. McLoskey also received the Orovitz Award from the University of Miami, where he is an Assistant Professor. Current projects include new works for The Ibis Camerata and Dinosaur Annex Ensemble in Boston. Recordings of his music are released on Albany, Wergo Schallplatten, Capstone, and Tantara Records.

 

Daniel GawthropDaniel E. Gawthrop was commissioned by the American Guild of Organists, this year. The resulting work, a four-movement suite for solo organ called Four Noble Gases, premiered in Baltimore in July by concert organist Eric Plutz.
Also in July, a new CD devoted to Gawthrop’s published organ music was released on the Grace Notes Media label by performer Dr. David Pickering. Additionally, a new choral work commissioned by Furman University premiered during the Piccolo Spoleto festival. Dr. Bingham Vick conducted the Furman Singers for the premiere of that piece, Stand Ye on the Mountain.

Commissions now in progress include works for ensembles in St. Louis, Missiouri; Atlanta, Georgia; Syracuse, New York and Durham, North Carolina.


Steven RicksSteven L. Ricks received his early musical training as a trombonist in Mesa, Arizona. He holds degrees in composition from Brigham Young University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Utah. Ricks received a Certificate of Advanced Musical Studies from King ’s College London in 2000, supported by a Graduate Research Fellowship from the University of Utah. His teachers and musical mentors have included Morris Rosenzweig, Sir Harrison Birtwistle, Bill Brooks, and Michael Hicks.

Ricks’ prizes and honors include First Prize in the 1999 SCI/ASCAP Student Composition Competition and four Barlow Endowment Commissions. He has been a fellow at June in Buffalo and the Composers Conference
at Wellesley College, and his works have been performed by many leading contemporary music ensembles and performers including the New York New Music Ensemble, Earplay, the California EAR Unit, the Talujon Percussion Quartet, flutist Rachel Rudich, pianist Ian Pace and violinist Curtis Macomber. Ricks is currently an Assistant Professor of Music Theory and Composition at Brigham Young University where he directs the Electronic Music Studio.

Guest Judges

John Costa
John Costa
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah
Ray Dillard
Nexus
Toronto, Canada
Ray Dillard
Anders Loguin
Anders Loguin
Kroumata
Stockholm, Sweden
Adam Sliwinski
So Percussion
Brooklyn, New York
Adam Sliwinski

Back to Top


BarlowEndowment@byu.edu | 2010 Brigham Young University | All Rights Reserved